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I am coding this thing and it would be helpful to have a static const set<char> containing some elements that won't change... Ever

class MyClass {
     private:
         static const set<char> mySet = ??  
}

How can I do this? It would be nice if you could create them from a string, like mySet("ABC"), but I can't get the syntax to work.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Something like this will work just fine:

// my_class.h
class MyClass
{
  static const std::set<char> mySet;
};

// my_class.cpp
const char *tmp = "ABCDEFGHI";
const std::set<char> MyClass::mySet(tmp,tmp+strlen(tmp));
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1  
+1, I totally forgot about range-based initialization. Certainly works well if it can be easily expressed as a range, but works not-so-well if it contains some computation. –  Xeo Apr 4 '11 at 20:30
    
+1, your answer is way more elegant than mine –  Cameron Apr 4 '11 at 20:32
    
If you write const char tmp[] = "ABCDEFGHI";, you can use sizeof(tmp)-1 (which is an Integral Constant Expression) –  MSalters Apr 5 '11 at 7:34

You can't initialize the variable inside the class, because it technically hasn't been defined yet (only declared).

In the class, keep static const set<char> mySet;.

In the implementation (i.e. .cpp file):

const char[] _MyClassSetChars = "ABC";

// Define and initialize the set, using
// the constructor that takes a start and end iterator
const set<char> MyClass::mySet(
    _MyClassSetChars,
    _MyClassSetChars + sizeof(_MyClassSetChars) / sizeof(_MyClassSetChars[0])
);

This also includes the terminating null character (\0) in the set, which is probably not what you want -- instead, use this:

const set<char> MyClass::mySet(
    _MyClassSetChars,
    _MyClassSetChars + (sizeof(_MyClassSetChars) / sizeof(_MyClassSetChars[0]) - 1)
);

Note that here you can use <cstring>'s strlen() (as per Let_Me_Be's answer) in place of the more general form above:

const set<char> MyClass::mySet(
    _MyClassSetChars,
    _MyClassSetChars + strlen(_MyClassSetChars)
);

Also see this question.

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1  
Aren't you adding one character to much? –  Let_Me_Be Apr 4 '11 at 20:24
    
@Let_Me_Be: Oops, I forgot about that good ol' \0. Editing... –  Cameron Apr 4 '11 at 20:29

Something like the following ought to work..

#include <iostream>
#include <set>

struct foo
{
  static std::set<char> init_chars();

  static const std::set<char> myChars;
};

const std::set<char> foo::myChars = foo::init_chars();

std::set<char> foo::init_chars()
{
  std::string sl("ABDCEDFG");
  return std::set<char>(sl.begin(), sl.end());
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << foo::myChars.size() << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
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@0A0D, oops, fixed... –  Nim Apr 4 '11 at 20:33

Have you tried static set <const char> mySet; ? Of course you need to initialize it first otherwise if you try to insert after you declare your set, it will fail.

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// in header
class MyClass {
     private:
         // static initialization function
         static std::set<char> InitMySet();
         static const std::set<char> mySet;  
};

// in cpp
std::set<char> MyClass::InitMySet(){
  std::set<char> ret;
  // fill ret
  return ret;
}

const std::set<char> MyClass::mySet = MyClass::InitMySet();
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header file:
#include<set>
class MyClass {
private:
    static const std::set<char> mySet;
}

source file:
#include<boost/assign.hpp>
const MyClass::mySet = boost::assign::list_of('A')('B')('C');
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