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The following code works properly for me:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
N = int(raw_input("N="))
l=[]
i = 0
while i<N:
   n = raw_input("e"+str(i)+"=")
   l.append(n) 
   i = i+1   
print l  

But, why can't I simplify it by using l[i] = raw_input("e"+str(i)+"=") instead?

Example: (doesn't work)

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
N = int(raw_input("N="))
l=[]
i = 0
while i<N:
   l[i] = raw_input("e"+str(i)+"=")
   i = i+1   
print l 
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can only use indexing (e.g. obj[x]) to access or modify items that already exist in a list. For example, the following works because the positions in the list that we are accessing already exist:

>>> chars = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> chars[0]
'a'
>>> chars[0] = 'd'
>>> chars
['d', 'b', 'c']

However, accessing or modifying items at positions that do not exist in a list will not work:

>>> chars = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> chars[3]
...
IndexError: list index out of range
>>> chars[3] = 'd'
...
IndexError: list assignment index out of range
>>> chars
['a', 'b', 'c']

If you want to simplify your code, try: (it uses a list comprehension)

N = int(raw_input("N="))
l = [raw_input("e" + str(i) + "=") for i in range(N)]
print l
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you shorter than my code,I must change to this approach ,thanks –  BandOfBrothers Apr 4 '11 at 21:03
    
you mean for obj[x] we only access not can assigned? –  BandOfBrothers Apr 4 '11 at 21:04
    
You can access and assign, but only to positions in a list that already exist. –  bradley.ayers Apr 4 '11 at 21:06
    
your answer is perfect ,But I dont understand what you have say more here? Could you give me some example about this? thanks –  BandOfBrothers Apr 4 '11 at 21:08
    
@IEnAk I've modified my answer – hopefully it's more clear. –  bradley.ayers Apr 4 '11 at 21:17
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I think in your second example, I think you mean why you can't directly assign list elements. The answer to that is because the elements have not been initialized ie. the list size is still 0. You could do

l = [0] * N

To initialize the list to N elements with a value of 0.

Or you could just do:

l.append(raw_input("e"+str(i)+"="))
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A value has to exist before you can assign to it. The first time round the loop, i is 0 and l[0] does not exist yet.

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Short answer: because the [] operator doesn't work like that with lists. It lets you access an existing index in the list, nothing more.

Edit: you can override that behaviour in your own class if you wrap a list, should you for some reason need it. See here:

http://docs.python.org/release/2.5.2/ref/sequence-types.html

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good tips.thanks Santiago Lezica –  BandOfBrothers Apr 4 '11 at 21:06
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