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How do I test whether a string contains only numbers and spaces using RegEx?

i.e.

  1. 021 123 4567 is valid
  2. 0211234567 is valid
  3. 0211 234 567 is valid

Pretty loose, but this meets my requirements.

Suggestions?

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Of course phone numbers can be expressed as letters as well (1-800-flowers or contacts or whatever) –  ryber Apr 5 '11 at 0:21
    
@ryber: It's for users cell phone numbers (New Zealand format) –  Marko Apr 5 '11 at 2:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about /^[\d ]+$/? If it needs to start and end with a digit, /^\d[\d ]*\d$/ should do it.

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That's failing for me with any numbers. I'm just testing with "012 323 2313" here regular-expressions.info/javascriptexample.html –  Marko Apr 4 '11 at 23:15
1  
@Marko, don't include the /'s if you are using that tester. Just put the text ^[\d ]+$ –  Aaron D Apr 4 '11 at 23:18
1  
@Marko: did you remove the leading and trailing /? Those are just regex delimiters. Try the string ^\d[\d ]*\d$ and you'll see that it matches 012 323 2313 just fine. –  CanSpice Apr 4 '11 at 23:18
    
Gotcha. That seems to be working perfect thanks! +1 –  Marko Apr 4 '11 at 23:20
  • [0-9] <-- this means any single digit between 0 and 9
  • [0-9 ] <-- this means any single digit between 0 and 9, or a space
  • [0-9 ]{1,} <-- this means any single digit between 0 and 9, or a space, 1 or more times
  • [0-9 ]{1,9} <-- this means any single digit between 0 and 9, or a space, 1 to 9 times
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n of digits with any number of spaces:

^(\s*\d\s*){11}$

here n=11; Test: here

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Something like:

\d*|\s+^[A-Za-z]
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Doesn't that allow letters as well? –  Marko Apr 4 '11 at 23:11
    
@Marko You can use a RegEx tester like this one to test it out. :) regexlib.com/RETester.aspx –  eandersson Apr 4 '11 at 23:13
    
@Fuji, I did (this one regular-expressions.info/javascriptexample.html) and putting "Asdasd" comes back as successful. –  Marko Apr 4 '11 at 23:14
    
That will always match any string. \d* matches "zero or more digits", and every string has zero or more digits in it. –  CanSpice Apr 4 '11 at 23:17
    
@Marko, It does indeed look like this one isn't working perfectly. :) –  eandersson Apr 4 '11 at 23:17

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