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I've inherited a bunch of code that makes extensive use of parallel arrays to store key/value pairs. It actually made sense to do it this way, but it's sort of awkward to write loops that iterate over these values. I really like the new Java foreach construct, but it does not seem like there is a way to iterate over parallel lists using this.

With a normal for loop, I can do this easily:

for (int i = 0; i < list1.length; ++i) {
    doStuff(list1[i]);
    doStuff(list2[i]);
}

But in my opinion this is not semantically pure, since we are not checking the bounds of list2 during iteration. Is there some sexy syntax similar to the for-each that I can use with parallel lists?

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2  
Re: semantic purity -- you could check the list2 bounds during iteration ((i < list1.length) && (i < list2.length)) or if you know the lists will be unmodified during iteration you could check right before the loop to see if list1 and list2 have equal lengths, in which case you can get away with not checking the bounds of both during iteration with a clear conscience. –  QuantumMechanic Apr 4 '11 at 23:47
    
If a thread modifies list2 but not list1, then I'm screwed. –  Travis Webb Apr 4 '11 at 23:53
1  
Well like I said -- "if you know the lists will be unmodified during iteration". Also, that would leave you no worse off than you are now. And if you have to worry about multiple threads hitting these lists then you have more worries than just this loop. –  QuantumMechanic Apr 5 '11 at 0:03
    
I'm not sure to what use cases my code may be adapted in the future. I'd prefer to not introduce a potentially very hard-to-find bug. –  Travis Webb Apr 5 '11 at 1:15
    
True. But if list1 and list2 can be modified by another thread during iteration (either by changing elements in the existing arrays or by making the variables refer to different arrays entirely) then it doesn't matter how you write the loop or how you check the bounds -- you're in potential trouble here -- and anywhere else you use those arrays. –  QuantumMechanic Apr 5 '11 at 3:34
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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I would use a Map myself. But taking you at your word that a pair of arrays makes sense in your case, how about a utility method that takes your two arrays and returns an Iterable wrapper?

Conceptually:

for (Pair<K,V> p : wrap(list1, list2)) {
    doStuff(p.getKey());
    doStuff(p.getValue());
}

The Iterable<Pair<K,V>> wrapper would hide the bounds checking.

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The old Pair to solve everything. Didn't think about that, nice. Isn't there a JSR somewhere begging for this to be included in the language? –  Travis Webb Apr 4 '11 at 23:52
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From the official Oracle page on the enhanced for loop:

Finally, it is not usable for loops that must iterate over multiple collections in parallel. These shortcomings were known by the designers, who made a conscious decision to go with a clean, simple construct that would cover the great majority of cases.

Basically, you're best off using the normal for loop.

If you're using these pairs of arrays to simulate a Map, you could always write a class that implements the Map interface with the two arrays; this could let you abstract away much of the looping.

Without looking at your code, I cannot tell you whether this option is the best way forward, but it is something you could consider.

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This was a fun exercise. I created an object called ParallelList that takes a variable number of typed lists, and can iterate over the values at each index (returned as a list of values):

public class ParallelList<T> implements Iterable<List<T>> {

    private final List<List<T>> lists;

    public ParallelList(List<T>... lists) {
        this.lists = new ArrayList<List<T>>(lists.length);
        this.lists.addAll(Arrays.asList(lists));
    }

    public Iterator<List<T>> iterator() {
        return new Iterator<List<T>>() {
            private int loc = 0;

            public boolean hasNext() {
                boolean hasNext = false;
                for (List<T> list : lists) {
                    hasNext |= (loc < list.size());
                }
                return hasNext;
            }

            public List<T> next() {
                List<T> vals = new ArrayList<T>(lists.size());
                for (int i=0; i<lists.size(); i++) {
                    vals.add(loc < lists.get(i).size() ? lists.get(i).get(loc) : null);
                }
                loc++;
                return vals;
            }

            public void remove() {
                for (List<T> list : lists) {
                    if (loc < list.size()) {
                        list.remove(loc);
                    }
                }
            }
        };
    }
}

Example usage:

List<Integer> list1 = Arrays.asList(new Integer[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5});
List<Integer> list2 = Arrays.asList(new Integer[] {6, 7, 8});
ParallelList<Integer> list = new ParallelList<Integer>(list1, list2);
for (List<Integer> ints : list) {
    System.out.println(String.format("%s, %s", ints.get(0), ints.get(1)));
}

Which would print out:

1, 6
2, 7
3, 8
4, null
5, null

This object supports lists of variable lengths, but clearly it could be modified to be more strict.

Unfortunately I couldn't get rid of one compiler warning on the ParallelList constructor: A generic array of List<Integer> is created for varargs parameters, so if anyone knows how to get rid of that, let me know :)

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3  
@SuppressWarnings ;-) –  Travis Webb Apr 5 '11 at 1:16
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You can use a second constraint in your for loop:

    for (int i = 0; i < list1.length && i < list2.length; ++i) 
    {
      doStuff(list1[i]);
      doStuff(list2[i]);
    }//for

One of my preferred methods for traversing collections is the for-each loop, but as the oracle tutorial mentions, when dealing with parallel collections to use the iterator rather than the for-each.

The following was an answer by Martin v. Löwis in a similar post:

it1 = list1.iterator();
it2 = list2.iterator();
while(it1.hasNext() && it2.hasNext()) 
{
   value1 = it1.next();
   value2 = it2.next();

   doStuff(value1);
   doStuff(value2);
}//while

The advantage to the iterator is that it's generic so if you don't know what the collections are being used, use the iterator, otherwise if you know what your collections are then you know the length/size functions and so the regular for-loop with the additional constraint can be used here. (Note I'm being very plural in this post as an interesting possibility would be where the collections used are different e.g. one could be a List and the other an array for instance)

Hope this helped.

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//Do you think I'm sexy?
if(list1.length == list2.length){
    for (int i = 0; i < list1.length; ++i) {
        doStuff(list1[i]);
        doStuff(list2[i]);
    }
}
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And everything mysteriously breaks when list1.length != list2.length. –  Isaac Truett Apr 4 '11 at 23:51
    
See my comment in response to @QuantumMechanic –  Travis Webb Apr 4 '11 at 23:53
    
@Isaac Truett, @Travis Webb, wrong tag, sorry. –  TOOTSKI Apr 4 '11 at 23:54
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