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I find the code below terribly difficult to read, and I wrote it! Is there any to

  1. avoid calling template for each implemented member function
  2. avoid having ClassName::member_function_name for each implemented member function? I find Java DRYer in this regard. You don't repeat the class name everywhere.

Thanks!

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
class Vertex
{
private:
    KeyType key;
    const ObjectType* object;
public:
    Vertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object);
    const KeyType getKey();
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType> 
class Graph
{
private:
    map<KeyType, Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> > vertexes;
public:
    const Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>& createVertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object);
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>::Vertex(const KeyType& objectKey, const ObjectType& newObject)
{
    key = objectKey;
    object = &newObject;
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
const KeyType Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>::getKey()
{
    return key;
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
const Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>& Graph<KeyType, ObjectType>::createVertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object)
{
    Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> *vertex = new Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>(key, object);
    vertexes.insert(make_pair(vertex->getKey(), *vertex));
    return *vertex;
};
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2  
just a small tip: I usually find classes easier to read with the public interface declared first –  da code monkey Apr 5 '11 at 0:53
    
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" I see nothing that unappealing with the code. –  Mikael Persson Apr 5 '11 at 1:08
    
You'll find the typedefs help simplify the code: for example, one for Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> could be used in quite a few places. –  Tony D Apr 5 '11 at 1:09
    
I should think you really want const KeyType getKey() to be const KeyType& getKey() const. –  Keith Apr 5 '11 at 1:27
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3 Answers

Being that this is a template, why not define the member functions right inside the class body?

The code needs to be available in a compilation unit for instantiation anyway, so you will not gain any compile time speedup from separating the declaration from the definition and compilers are nowadays smart enough to decide on their own whether inlining is necessary.

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I think that in this case, you can easily define the functions in the declaration, and use some typedefs to clear the syntax.

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
class Vertex {
  public:
    Vertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object) :
           key(objectKey), object(&newObject) { };
    const KeyType getKey() const { return key; };
  private:
    KeyType key;
    const ObjectType* object;
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType> 
class Graph {
  public:
    typedef Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> vertex_type;

    const vertex_type& createVertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object) {
      vertex_type* vertex = new vertex_type(key, object);
      vertexes.insert(make_pair(vertex->getKey(), *vertex));
      return *vertex;
    };
  private:
    map<KeyType, vertex_type > vertexes;
};
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This should be "almost" equivalent to your code. "almost", because as xDD said, the in-body definition of member function implicitly marks them as inline.

Class are private by default and Struct are public by default.

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
class Vertex
{
    KeyType key;
    const ObjectType* object;

    public:
        Vertex(const KeyType& _key, const ObjectType& _object) : key(_key), object(&_object) {}

        const KeyType getKey()
        {
            return key;
        }
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType> 
class Graph
{
    map<KeyType, Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> > vertexes;

    public:
        const Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>& createVertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object)
        {
            Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> *vertex = new Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType>(key, object);
            vertexes.insert(make_pair(vertex->getKey(), *vertex));
            return *vertex;
        }
};

or with typedef :

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType>
class Vertex
{
    KeyType key;
    const ObjectType* object;

    public:
        Vertex(const KeyType& _key, const ObjectType& _object) : key(_key), object(&_object) {}
        const KeyType getKey()
        {
            return key;
        }
};

template <class KeyType, class ObjectType> 
class Graph
{
    typedef Vertex<KeyType, ObjectType> tVertex;
    map<KeyType, tVertex > vertexes;

    public:
        const tVertex& createVertex(const KeyType& key, const ObjectType& object)
        {
            tVertex *vertex = new tVertex(key, object);
            vertexes.insert(make_pair(vertex->getKey(), *vertex));
            return *vertex;
        }
};
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Not strictly equivalent since in-body definition of member functions implicitly marks them as inline. –  xDD Apr 5 '11 at 1:05
    
@xDD : you are right, I will edit. –  Valkea Apr 5 '11 at 1:08
    
@xDD : On question comes into my mind ; does it apply with variadic templates too ? as the argument number is undefined it should not be able to inline them even if defined in-body. –  Valkea Apr 5 '11 at 1:13
    
@Alexandre - Note that you want template method definitions inline anyway, or you'll run into problems with the ODR. –  Keith Apr 5 '11 at 1:24
    
@Valke The important thing to understand is that templates are instantiated at compile-time, so the number of arguments is known and there is no problem with inlining. –  xDD Apr 5 '11 at 1:27
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