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Does this equation work for all sequences f[n]?

f[n_] :=  Module[{x = intial value, y = 0, i = 0},

            While[i++ < n, {x, y} = {y, equation}]; y]

Specifically, I'm looking at the equation 6*n*f[n]=f[n-1]+n! with initial condition f[0] = 7. But, I'd like the solution to general, so that I can apply it to other equations. And, I'd like to use Module and While.

thank you.

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1  
Yes, it does. I mean no, definitely not. That is to say, what is it you are asking? I cannot make sense of the above in any programming language I know (which would include Mathematica, on a good day at least). At a minumun: What is 'equation', and is n guaranteed to be a nonnegative value? –  Daniel Lichtblau Apr 5 '11 at 1:41
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Sure that will work. Syntatically there's nothing wrong with that actually. I'll guarantee you that it won't do what you want though. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 5 '11 at 1:48
    
@Daniel i meant 'formula' in a way and yeah n > 0 –  Sunday Apr 5 '11 at 1:52
    
@ Mike im trying to implement this sequence using the method shown above .....'6*n*f[n]=f[n-1]+n!' for f[0] = 7 and n>0 ..... –  Sunday Apr 5 '11 at 1:54
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@Sunday, with that additional info, I've edited your question. Also, it is preferred if you write in complete sentences and do not shorten words, e.g. thnx, but contractions are fine. By doing that you deviate from accepted English grammar which may make it difficult for a non-native speaker to read it. –  rcollyer Apr 5 '11 at 3:16
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2 Answers

The cleanest and most common way to implement a recurring sequence is to just define f using memoization, "remembering" terms as they are computed for efficiency:

f[0] = 7
f[n_Integer?Positive] := f[n] = (f[n - 1] + n!)/(6 n)

Then:

In[29]:= Table[f[n], {n, 0, 6}]

Out[29]= {7, 4/3, 5/18, 113/324, 7889/7776, 941009/233280, 168902609/8398080}

If you're not required to program the recurrence yourself, you could also use RecurrenceTable to generate terms directly without defining f:

In[30]:= RecurrenceTable[{a[0] == 7, 6 n a[n] == a[n - 1] + n!}, a, {n, 6}]

Out[30]= {7, 4/3, 5/18, 113/324, 7889/7776, 941009/233280, 168902609/8398080}
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So you want to calculate the sequence:

f(n) = (f(n-1) + n!) / (6 * n)

One way to implement it is:

f[n_] := Module[{values},
       values = Table[0, {n}];
       values[[1]] = 7;
       Do[values[[i]] = (values[[i-1]] + (i-1)!) / (6 * (i-1)), {i, 2, n}]
       values];

Or equivalently:

f[n_] := Module[{values, i = 2},
       values = Table[0, {n}];
       values[[1]] = 7;
       While[i <= n, values[[i]] = (values[[i-1]] + (i-1)!) / (6 * (i-1)); i++];
       values];

There are much more efficient ways though.

I forget the differences of Bock and Module off hand, but they're very similar.

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Buh i'm trying to use module and while commands cause they take less time to compute –  Sunday Apr 5 '11 at 2:34
    
@Sunday: Do loops are usually faster than While and For loops. Check my answer for the equivalent While loop. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 5 '11 at 2:37
    
Shudnt the output be this whereas urs gives both formulae give something else {4/3, 5/18, 113/324, 7889/7776, 941009/233280, 168902609/8398080, \ 42495225809/352719360, 14264139821009/16930529280, \ 6158014604947409/914248581120, 3323783265773203409/54854914867200} –  Sunday Apr 5 '11 at 2:44
    
@Sunday: Thanks, fixed the bug. Check my edited post. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 5 '11 at 2:47
    
Can you do it this way------> fib[n_] := Module[{x = 7, y = 0, i = 0}, While[i++ < n, {x, y} = {y, ((x + n!)/(6 n))}]; y] –  Sunday Apr 5 '11 at 3:07
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