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I am not the best programmer with c++ but I am trying to learn. I am trying to take user input and write it into a text file (without overwriting the old one) but I can't figure out where to plugin the variable (int). Here is my code so far...

int main()
{
   int i;
  cout << "Please enter something: ";
  cin >> i;

   FILE * pFile;
  pFile = fopen ("C:\\users\\grant\\desktop\\test.txt","a");
  if (pFile!=NULL)

    fputs ("C++ Rocks!",pFile);
    fclose (pFile);
  getch();
  return 0;
}

Also, if there is a more effecient way of doing this, please let me know! This is just what I was able to find on the internet that worked.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think this would do:

{
  string i; // dont forget to #include <string>
  cout << "Please enter something: ";
  cin >> i;

  FILE * pFile;
  pFile = fopen ("C:\\users\\grant\\desktop\\test.txt","a");
  if (pFile!=NULL)
  {
     fputs("C++ Rocks!", pFile);
     fputs(i.c_str(), pFile);
  }

  fclose (pFile);
  getch();
  return 0;
}
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1  
Yeah but that reads/writes an arbitrary string, while he probably wants to know how to output an integer. –  xDD Apr 5 '11 at 3:07
    
Since he is writing to a TXT file, I don't think that matters. For what I understand, he wants the number written inside the file too, so why not just read it as a string? –  karlphillip Apr 5 '11 at 3:12
    
Because that would also accept strings that are not numbers. –  xDD Apr 5 '11 at 3:13
    
It's not clear that he needed it to be integers only. –  karlphillip Apr 5 '11 at 3:15

That's the C way. (You can use fprintf to output your integer in a formatted string)

You should learn about the C++ Standard Library fstream class that allows you to write to files the same way you are doing it with the standard output right now.

std::ofstream my_file("test.txt");
my_file << i;
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Using C++ I/O may actually be more efficient, at least in terms of programmer's effort, in this case, since it uses the same operator<< for strings, integers, and all other types that can be output.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
int main()
{
    // open the file in append mode
    std::ofstream pFile("C:\\users\\grant\\desktop\\test.txt", std::ios::app);
    // append the string to the file
    pFile << "C++ Rocks!\n";

    // get a number from the user
    int i;
    std::cout << "Please enter something: ";
    std::cin >> i;
    // append the number to the file too
    pFile << i << '\n';
}
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