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 void  (*a)(char*, char*);

is this a function called a. returns void pointer? in c?

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You might want to bookmark cdecl.org –  mu is too short Apr 5 '11 at 3:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is declaration of a variable named a; it is a pointer to a function that takes two char* parameters and does not return anything. You will need to assign an actual function to a before calling it.

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No it doesn't; if a was a pointer to a function returning void*, the declaration would be void *(*a)(char*, char*);. –  Jeremiah Willcock Apr 5 '11 at 3:32

No.

It is a pointer to a function that takes two strings and returns nothing.

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It's a pointer to a function, which takes 2x char pointers & returns void (see cdecl.org)

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This is a function pointer named a. The function signature of a is a function that returns void and takes two char * arguments.

See Function Pointer Tutorials for more information on function pointers.

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It is a function pointer. Example:

void someFunction(char* param1, char* param2) {
   // ...
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
   char arg1[] = "Hello";
   char arg2[] = "World";
   void (*a)(char*, char*) = &someFunction;
   a(arg1, arg2);
   return 0;
}
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It's a variable which is a pointer to a function returning nothing, which takes two arguments of type "pointer to char". The function pointer is named "a".

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