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Exactly how much bloat does using a platform like the Netbeans Platform or Eclipse RCP actually add to your application? I am trying to decide if it is really neccessary for me to use it. I will only be using a very small amount of the functionality actually provided by the framework, all of which are relatively easy to implement from scratch.

All I basically need is some form of plugin management, where users code their libraries according to an API and my program can locate their services. This is easy enough to implement from scratch in a few lines of code. Further than that, I will need to do some 2D graphics work where widgets can be dragged and dropped etc. Does these two requirements make a strong enough case to use a framework? I am actually leaning more towards just doing it myself.

Thanks.

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If you are considering a writing your own plugin solution, I would highly recommend going with Eclipse's implementation of OSGi through the RCP. OSGi is rock solid, and handles things like alternate versions of the same library and all sorts of class-path issues. This will help your plugin providers, since they won't have to worry about what other libraries are present. This is much better than dropping a bunch of jars into the same classpath.

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The plugin library is the least of my problems actually. Have a look at JSPF (Java Simple Plugin Framework). It took me all of 5 minutes to get it up and running, and I love the simplicity. It also actually gives me all the functionality I require (even more than I do). But thanks for the answer. Do you have any other comments regarding the bloat that these frameworks add to the application. I really want a minimal footprint. –  Nico Huysamen Apr 7 '11 at 5:34
    
If a minimal footprint is one of your priorities, RCP at least is probably not the smallest. There are good reasons to use it, but if those reasons don't apply, I'd stick with what is working for you. –  Micah Hainline Apr 7 '11 at 13:18

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