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I am teaching myself C# (I don't know much yet). In this simple example:

bool?          n = null;

Console.WriteLine("n               = {0}", n);
Console.WriteLine("n.ToString()    = {0}", n.ToString());
Console.WriteLine("n.GetHashCode() = {0}", n.GetHashCode());

// this next statement causes a run time exception

Console.WriteLine("n.GetType()     = {0}", n.GetType());

Intuitively I understand why the GetType() method would throw an exception. The instance n is null which would explain that but, why don't I get an exception for the same reason when using n.GetHashCode() and ToString() ?

Thank you for your help,

John.

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5  
check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/194484/… –  mookid8000 Apr 5 '11 at 6:01
    
mookid, great thread. Thank you for pointing it out. –  Hex440bx Apr 5 '11 at 6:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

GetHashCode() is a virtual method overridden in Nullable<T>: when it's called on a Nullable<T> value, the Nullable<T> implementation is used, without any boxing.

GetType() isn't a virtual method, which means that when it's called, the value is boxed first... and boxing a "null" nullable value results in a null reference - hence the exception. We can see this from the IL:

static void Main()
{
    bool? x = null;
    Type t = x.GetType();
}

is compiled to:

.method private hidebysig static void Main() cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 1
    .locals init (
        [0] valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool> nullable,
        [1] class [mscorlib]System.Type 'type')
    L_0000: nop 
    L_0001: ldloca.s nullable
    L_0003: initobj [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool>
    L_0009: ldloc.0 
    L_000a: box [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool>
    L_000f: callvirt instance class [mscorlib]System.Type [mscorlib]System.Object::GetType()
    L_0014: stloc.1 
    L_0015: ret 
}

The important bit here is L_000a: the box instruction before the callvirt instruction at L_000f.

Now compare that with the equivalent code calling GetHashCode:

static void Main()
{
    bool? x = null;
    int hash = x.GetHashCode();
}

compiles to:

.method private hidebysig static void Main() cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 1
    .locals init (
        [0] valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool> nullable,
        [1] int32 num)
    L_0000: nop 
    L_0001: ldloca.s nullable
    L_0003: initobj [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool>
    L_0009: ldloca.s nullable
    L_000b: constrained [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<bool>
    L_0011: callvirt instance int32 [mscorlib]System.Object::GetHashCode()
    L_0016: stloc.1 
    L_0017: ret 
}

This time we have a constrained instruction/prefix before callvirt, which essentially means "You don't need to box when you call the virtual method." From the OpCodes.Constrained documentation:

The constrained prefix is designed to allow callvirt instructions to be made in a uniform way independent of whether thisType is a value type or a reference type.

(Follow the link for more information.)

Note that the way boxing of nullable value types work also means that even for a non-null value, you won't get Nullable<T>. For example consider:

int? x = 10;
Type t = x.GetType();
Console.WriteLine(t == typeof(int?)); // Prints False
Console.WriteLine(t == typeof(int)); // Prints True

So the type you get out is the non-nullable type involved. A call to object.GetType() will never return a Nullable<T> type.

share|improve this answer
    
short and solid answer. –  Tomas Jansson Apr 5 '11 at 6:06
    
Jon!! thank you very much. I started studying C# using your book "C# in Depth" but, it quickly got over my head. As a result, I went to the "C# Programming Guide" of VS2008. Your explanation makes perfect sense. Thank you again, John –  Hex440bx Apr 5 '11 at 6:08
    
@Tomas: Becoming longer over time, I'm afraid - but I like going into detail :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 5 '11 at 6:08
    
@Hex440bx: Sounds like a wise step - C# in Depth really does assume you already know a certain amount of C#. Hopefully it'll become useful to you over time. In this case, read chapter 4 carefully - I mention the boxing behaviour there, although I can't remember whether or not I call out this particular case. –  Jon Skeet Apr 5 '11 at 6:12
    
There is no doubt in my mind your book will be very useful in the future. It has already been useful in the sense that the first two chapters gave me a good idea of the features in C# that I do not want to miss. :-) –  Hex440bx Apr 5 '11 at 6:36

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