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I got used to writing enum-style singleton when all of a sudden, someone reviewing my code asked me change it because it is not in the project's coding convention. He asked me what is the benefit, I just said it is easier to write.

I just want to know if there's really no benefit in using it. I understand that enum for java might not have been implemented for this purpose but even then, is it wrong to use it this way?

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Your answer is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/70689/… –  Brian Roach Apr 5 '11 at 7:17
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

I got used to writing enum-style singleton when all of a sudden, someone reviewing my code asked me change it because it is not in the project's coding convention. He asked me what is the benefit, I just said it is easier to write.

Another benefit of enums-style singletons over classic ones is that they have singleton semantics in the face of Java Object Serialization. (The Java Object Serialization and the enum base-class combine to ensure that deserialization doesn't create copies of enum constants. It is rather hard to get this right for a singleton implemented the classic way. And if you get it wrong there can be multiple instances of some singleton class ... and potentially problems.)

But I'd be inclined to carefully examine the basis for your colleague's objection.

  • Does the coding style specifically forbid enum's ?
  • Does the coding style specifically forbid enum-style singletons ?
  • Does the coding style specifically prescribe a particular way of implementing singletons ?

If none of the above, then "not in the coding standard" doesn't sound like a valid objection. (Surely, something doesn't need to be explicitly "in" the coding standard to be allowed ... that would be control-freak crazy stuff!)

My guess is that your colleague has spotted an example of a singleton in your coding standard, and concluded (incorrectly) that it means that singletons must be implemented that way.

(Or maybe you really are lumbered with an overly prescriptive coding standard. If that's the case, you have my sympathy.)


The other point is that the Singleton pattern needs to be used sparingly, as it is an impediment to testability, and potentially problematic for applications that are deployed in web containers and the like.

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+1 for serialization issues. You could also generalize that and note that enum-style singletons get help from the JVM to ensure the "singletonness", not only in the context of serialization but also regarding reflection etc. –  gustafc Apr 5 '11 at 7:48
    
I was not prepared to defend myself from using enum style because I do not know what's happening behind. I adopted it's usage for the simple reasons that it is simple to write and it is safer (I believe) in a sense that I can sleep at night without worrying that my singleton may become mulitpleton in the future... –  demotics2002 Apr 7 '11 at 7:22
    
Quote: " I can sleep at night without worrying that my singleton may become mulitpleton in the future" Just make sure no one will add another Enum value to your Enum singleton, so you don't end up with this: public enum MySingleton{ // please! don't add more values here INSTANCE, INSTANCE2,INSTANCE3,.... –  DhafirNz Sep 10 at 19:47

You can refer to:

Item 3 of Effective Java 2nd --  Enforce the singleton property with a private constructor or an enum type

It has a full and detailed discussion on this issue.

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You are both right. Good coding conventions are as valuable as elegant code. Your task would be to introduce your idea to the coding convention and change that first, before you add new styles to a potentially big project.

What you shouldn't have is 50 ways of declaring singletons, which are considered an anti-pattern by some anyway.

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I can sleep at night without worrying that my singleton may become mulitpleton in the future

Just make sure no one will add another Enum value to your Enum singleton, so you don't end up with this:

public enum MySingleton{ 
// Should only have one INSTANCE, so please! don't add more values here 
INSTANCE, INSTANCE2,INSTANCE3,... etc ;
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