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The piece of code that I have looks some what like this:

glbl_array = # a 3 Gb array

def my_func( args, def_param = glbl_array):
    #do stuff on args and def_param

if __name__ == '__main__':
  pool = Pool(processes=4)
  pool.map(my_func, range(1000))

Is there a way to make sure (or encourage) that the different processes does not get a copy of glbl_array but shares it. If there is no way to stop the copy I will go with a memmapped array, but my access patterns are not very regular, so I expect memmapped arrays to be slower. The above seemed like the first thing to try. This is on Linux. I just wanted some advice from Stackoverflow and do not want to annoy the sysadmin. Do you think it will help if the the second parameter is a genuine immutable object like glbl_array.tostring().

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I thought different processes can't share memory variables – Andrey Apr 5 '11 at 9:11
7  
@Andrey: Then you learned something today :) – Sven Marnach Apr 5 '11 at 12:45
up vote 66 down vote accepted

You can use the shared memory stuff from multiprocessing together with Numpy fairly easily:

import multiprocessing
import ctypes
import numpy as np

shared_array_base = multiprocessing.Array(ctypes.c_double, 10*10)
shared_array = np.ctypeslib.as_array(shared_array_base.get_obj())
shared_array = shared_array.reshape(10, 10)

#-- edited 2015-05-01: the assert check below checks the wrong thing
#   with recent versions of Numpy/multiprocessing. That no copy is made
#   is indicated by the fact that the program prints the output shown below.
## No copy was made
##assert shared_array.base.base is shared_array_base.get_obj()

# Parallel processing
def my_func(i, def_param=shared_array):
    shared_array[i,:] = i

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=4)
    pool.map(my_func, range(10))

    print shared_array

which prints

[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 2.  2.  2.  2.  2.  2.  2.  2.  2.  2.]
 [ 3.  3.  3.  3.  3.  3.  3.  3.  3.  3.]
 [ 4.  4.  4.  4.  4.  4.  4.  4.  4.  4.]
 [ 5.  5.  5.  5.  5.  5.  5.  5.  5.  5.]
 [ 6.  6.  6.  6.  6.  6.  6.  6.  6.  6.]
 [ 7.  7.  7.  7.  7.  7.  7.  7.  7.  7.]
 [ 8.  8.  8.  8.  8.  8.  8.  8.  8.  8.]
 [ 9.  9.  9.  9.  9.  9.  9.  9.  9.  9.]]

However, Linux has copy-on-write semantics on fork(), so even without using multiprocessing.Array, the data will not be copied unless it is written to.

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Excellent! that was a great answer. One doubt, do the definition of shared_array, shared_array_base need to be protected by if __name__ == '__main__':. My concern is that every time the module is loaded they will be redefined and cost additional space. But I may well be wrong. – san Apr 5 '11 at 17:28
    
The only constraint wrt. multiprocessing is that shared_array_base is defined before calling pool.map. fork() and multiprocessing.Pool will not re-import modules, so the only thing you need to be careful is with memory allocation inside my_func(). – pv. Apr 6 '11 at 13:12
5  
Just to note, on Python fork() actually means copy on access (because just accessing the object will change its ref-count). – Fabio Zadrozny Jun 7 '12 at 17:34
6  
The copy will only copy the memory page on which the refcount integer resides. The data in Numpy arrays is therefore not copied. – pv. Jun 11 '12 at 11:54
2  
got it. you should use np.frombuffer(shared_array_base.get_obj()) instead of np.ctypeslib.as_array – Moj Jun 4 '13 at 14:49

For those stuck using Windows, which does not support fork() (unless using CygWin), pv's answer does not work. Globals are not made available to child processes.

Instead, you must pass the shared memory during the initializer of the Pool/Process as such:

#! /usr/bin/python

import time

from multiprocessing import Process, Queue, Array

def f(q,a):
    m = q.get()
    print m
    print a[0], a[1], a[2]
    m = q.get()
    print m
    print a[0], a[1], a[2]

if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = Array('B', (1, 2, 3), lock=False)
    q = Queue()
    p = Process(target=f, args=(q,a))
    p.start()
    q.put([1, 2, 3])
    time.sleep(1)
    a[0:3] = (4, 5, 6)
    q.put([4, 5, 6])
    p.join()

(it's not numpy and it's not good code but it illustrates the point ;-)

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The following code works on Win7 and Mac (maybe on linux, but not tested).

import multiprocessing
import ctypes
import numpy as np

#-- edited 2015-05-01: the assert check below checks the wrong thing
#   with recent versions of Numpy/multiprocessing. That no copy is made
#   is indicated by the fact that the program prints the output shown below.
## No copy was made
##assert shared_array.base.base is shared_array_base.get_obj()

shared_array = None

def init(shared_array_base):
    global shared_array
    shared_array = np.ctypeslib.as_array(shared_array_base.get_obj())
    shared_array = shared_array.reshape(10, 10)

# Parallel processing
def my_func(i):
    shared_array[i, :] = i

if __name__ == '__main__':
    shared_array_base = multiprocessing.Array(ctypes.c_double, 10*10)

    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=4, initializer=init, initargs=(shared_array_base,))
    pool.map(my_func, range(10))

    shared_array = np.ctypeslib.as_array(shared_array_base.get_obj())
    shared_array = shared_array.reshape(10, 10)
    print shared_array
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