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I am using annotation based declarative approach for spring aop. sample code

ClassA{
@Transactional(readOnly = false, propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
add()
{
method1();
method2();
method3();

}
}

But I have still doubt on use of propagation.does propagation.Requires_New means that each request will start new transaction.

Second question:

Does failure of any method like method2,method3 will cause the transaction to rollback?

I will be very happy if any can help me to leans transaction propagation.

can someone provide me a real world example where we need a participate in existing transaction.because I visualise that add function that we are using in above example will be independent for all users,or any other function will be independent to each user who is calling. I am not able to find example where other propagation behaviour like PROPAGATION_SUPPORTS ,PROPAGATION_MANDATORY,PROPAGATION_REQUIRES_NEW etc. are used

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3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Answering this comment, not the actual question:

transaction are session specific or request specific – Vish 3 hours ago

Neither. request and session are both web-specific scopes, while the Spring Transaction abstraction has nothing to do with web technologies.

The scope of @Transactional is per method invocation, as @Transactional is implemented through Spring AOP. The transactional state is kept in ThreadLocal variables which are initialized when the outermost @Transactional method is entered and cleared with commit or rollback when it is left. This whole abstraction works on Java method level, and hence does not require or profit from a web container.


And in response to this Question in the comment below:

thanks @sean,i am stil not able to get answer where other propagation behaviour like PROPAGATION_SUPPORTS ,PROPAGATION_MANDATORY,PROPAGATION_REQUIRES_NEW etc are used. please refer above for whole question

Here's the list of Propagation values with my comments:

MANDATORY
Support a current transaction, throw an exception if none exists.

Does not start a new Transaction, just checks whether a transaction is active (must be inside either another @Transactional method call or a programmatically created transaction)

NESTED
Execute within a nested transaction if a current transaction exists, behave like PROPAGATION_REQUIRED else.

Start a nested transaction if a transaction exists, start a new transaction otherwise.

NEVER
Execute non-transactionally, throw an exception if a transaction exists.

Does not start a transaction. Fails if a transaction is present.

NOT_SUPPORTED
Execute non-transactionally, suspend the current transaction if one exists.

Does not start a transaction. Suspends any existing transaction.

REQUIRED
Support a current transaction, create a new one if none exists.

If a transaction exists, use that, if not, create a new one. In 95% of cases, this is what you need.

REQUIRES_NEW
Create a new transaction, suspend the current transaction if one exists.

Always creates a new transaction, no matter if an existing transaction is present. If there is, it will be suspended for the duration of this method execution.

SUPPORTS
Support a current transaction, execute non-transactionally if none exists.

Can use a transaction if one is present, but doesn't need one (and won't start a new one either)


In most cases, REQUIRED is what you need (hence it's the default in the @Transactional annotation). I have personally never seen any other value but REQUIRED and REQUIRES_NEW in use.

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thanks @sean,i am stil not able to get answer where other propagation behaviour like PROPAGATION_SUPPORTS ,PROPAGATION_MANDATORY,PROPAGATION_REQUIRES_NEW etc are used. please refer above for whole question –  Vish Apr 6 '11 at 6:23
    
Thanks @Sean.so if multiple request are invoking a same method say ADD(),REQUIRED annotation will make them to run in the same transaction??.but i think all the Add() method invocation will be independent to each other in term of transaction..there is still a bit of confusion –  Vish Apr 6 '11 at 11:21
1  
@Vish No, never. A new request always means a new method invocation in a new thread and hence a new transaction. All of this transactional stuff happens within one method invocation, the outermost one. It gets tricky when the outer method calls an inner transactional method, but calling the outer method twice means two transactions, whether it's in a web context or not. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Apr 6 '11 at 13:19
    
+1 Wonderful explanation. Could you please explain > The transactional state is kept in ThreadLocal variables which are initialized when the outermost @Transactional method is entered and cleared with commit or rollback when it is left. –  Tapas Bose Dec 29 '12 at 9:17

Transaction propagation indicates what should be the behaviour of the given method when it is invoked. REQUIRES_NEW means that a new transaction should always be started, even if there is an ongoing transaction.

If method1(), for example, defines REQUIRES_NEW, than it will execute in a new transaction.

An exception will rollback the current active transaction, yes.

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Yes. Requires_New means that each request will start new transaction. and Yes failure in method2,method3 will cause the transaction to rollback, depending on the rollback properties. check Transactional properties.

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thanks Bozho and Manish. –  Vish Apr 5 '11 at 11:15
    
transaction are session specific or request specific –  Vish Apr 5 '11 at 11:16

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