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If I have a string of pipe-delimited data:

123456|abcd|||65464|hgfhgf

How can I replace any occurrance of || with: | |?

So it would end up looking like this:

123456|abcd| | |65464|hgfhgf

I tried using the simple Java expression:

delimString.replaceAll("\\\|\\\|", "| |");

but that only replaced the first occurrence:

123456|abcd| ||65464|hgfhgf

So I need something to make it repeat (greedily I think).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted
String resultString = subjectString.replaceAll("\\|(?=\\|)", "| ");

The regex explained without Java's double backslashes:

\|   # Match a literal |
(?=  # only if it's followed by
 \|  # another literal |.
)    # End of lookahead assertion

You could even go wild and replace the empty space between two pipes with a space character:

String resultString = subjectString.replaceAll("(?<=\\|)(?=\\|)", " ");
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Excellent. Regex often has me stumped, but your explanation makes things understandable. Thank you. –  Chris Apr 6 '11 at 7:51
    
Very accurate regex and well explained also +1 –  sfrj Feb 13 '13 at 12:43

The problem is here that the match position is already past the 2nd | you replaced, so it does not count. You'll have to use a while loop to do this.

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1  
The diagnosis is correct, the solution is overkill ;-) See Tims answer. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 5 '11 at 11:32
    
Well, this is indeed quite elegant (for regex literates, that is:), but I find "overkill" a bit stark a word for a nicely readable while loop ... –  Ingo Apr 5 '11 at 11:34
    
Agreed. Overkill is too strong a word. "unnecessary" would have been better. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 5 '11 at 11:35

I agree with Ingo - a loop solution is more lines of code but easier to understand (at least it doesn't have to be explained ;) ):

String test = "abc|def||ghi|||jkl";

StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
char previous = 0;
for (char c:test.toCharArray()) {
  if (c == '|' && previous == '|')
    result.append(" ");
  result.append(c);
  previous = c;
}

System.out.println(result);
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This is a nice loop and more understandable than the regex. Minor gripe: result.append(' '); would be slightly faster. –  Steve Powell Apr 5 '11 at 12:07

Sorry about my answer before i made a mistake. I just updated.

This is an alternative that will work 100% sure have a look at it:

 public static void main(String [] args) {

        String data = "123456|abcd|||65464|hgfhgf";
        String modified = "";
        for(int i = 0; i < data.length();i++) {
            if(data.charAt(i) == '|') {
                modified += "| |";
            }
            else {
                modified += "" + data.charAt(i);
            }
        }
        System.out.print(modified);
}

At the end it will look like this:

123456| |abcd| || || |65464| |hgfhgf

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This is wrong on so many levels...did you test this? The output is | |1| |2| |3| |4| |5| |6| ||| |a| |b| |c| |d| ||| ||| ||| |6| |5| |4| |6| |4| ||| |h| |g| |f| |h| |g| |f| | –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 5 '11 at 11:34
    
this won't work like author wants. this will change | to | | after 123456 –  Innuendo Apr 5 '11 at 11:35
    
@ sfrj, and again: Author wants result to be 123456|abcd| | |65464|hgfhgf Compare with your result. –  Innuendo Apr 5 '11 at 11:43
    
Sorry about that, i just updated it, have a look it works now. –  sfrj Apr 5 '11 at 11:44
1  
At least sfrj is trying, a sincere effort does not deserve a downvote imho. @srfj: you need to make sure the next character is also a | before you append "| |". And appending the second | is wrong, you should append only |. Actually it may be better if you check the previous character, not next. Think about why. –  Miserable Variable Apr 5 '11 at 13:44

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