Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does git handle filename changes?

Will a file name change be detected as a modification or will there be a "lost" file which needs to be removed and the new file needs to then be added with git add ?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

It will automatically be detected as a modification and the "new" file will be added to the index, so you only need one command:

[/cfgdev/python (buildServer) dbg]$ git mv application.py newApplication.py
[/cfgdev/python (buildServer) dbg]$ git status
# On branch buildServer
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       renamed:    application.py -> newApplication.py

And a commit of course ..

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect thanks. –  Helium3 Apr 5 '11 at 12:22
add comment

In each commit, git records the state of your source tree, rather than whether there was a rename (or whatever) that produced that state. So, if you just rename a file normally (rather than with git mv), the output of git status will be something like:

# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   deleted:    foo.txt
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   bar.txt
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

If you then decide that you want to record the state of the tree with that file renamed, you can stage that change with:

 git rm foo.txt
 git add bar.txt

... then git status will show you:

# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   renamed:    foo.txt -> bar.txt

... and you can commit that with git commit as usual:

git commit -m "Renamed foo.txt to bar.txt"

The important point is to bear in mind is that when git tells you that a file has been renamed when you view history, that's because it has worked out that rename must have happened by comparing the state of the tree from one version to another - it doesn't mean that a rename operation was recorded in the history.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As previous answers have explained, Git derives a file rename operation from the change in content in your source tree. To record a rename operation, Git stores both a delete and add operation, and not the rename operation itself.

As Magnus Skog pointed out git mv <filename1> <filename2> tells Git to add the content in <filename1> to <filename2> and remove <filename1> from the file tree.

As Mark Longair explained, if instead of git mv, you use shell command mv <filename1> <filename2>, Git will not detect the rename operation until you invoke git rm <filename1> and git add <filename2>.

However, another way to tell Git about rename operations with mv is to use git add --all. This command instructs Git to detect and prepare to commit all files in your workspace that differ from those in the repository, including those that you've renamed:

$ ls
a  b  c  d
$ mv d e
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   deleted:    d
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   e
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
$ git add --all
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   renamed:    d -> e
#

git add --all is a very convenient way to commit a large number of files that you've renamed in your workspace using a script or bulk renaming tool, for example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

git mv

This keeps the history and moves the file. Need to do a commit afterwards so the repo is upto date.

Git will also pick up files that are moved in the filesystem on commit (some times) and on occasions comes up with a false positive when a file is deleted and a new (but similar) file is created.

It will also move the file in the filesystem (this can be overridden). So no need to do an git add

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.