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Hi whats the best way to implement a stack using linked lists? I never know whether to rely googled sites...

EDIT: In Java....

EDIT: I would define best as most efficient using clean code. I have already used an array to implement a stack, but am not familiar with link lists so was wondering if anyone could help me implement something similar to below:

public class StackArray{

    private Object [] objArray;
    private int stackSize;

    public StackArray(){
    objArray = new Object[50];
    stackSize = 0;
    }

    public StackArray(int size){
    objArray = new Object[size];
    stackSize = 0;
    }

    //public interface methods - push, pop, top, empty & clear
    public void push(Object o)throws StackArrayException{
    if(stackSize < objArray.length){
        objArray[stackSize] = o;
        stackSize ++;
    }else{
        throw new StackArrayException("Stack Overflow");
    }
    }

    public Object pop()throws StackArrayException{
    if(stackSize != 0){
        stackSize--;
        return(objArray[stackSize]);
    }else{
        throw new StackArrayException("Stack Underflow");
    }
    }

    public void top()throws StackArrayException{
    if(stackSize != 0){
        return(objArray[stackSize-1]);
    }else{
        throw new StackArrayException("Stack Underflow");
    }
    }

    public boolean empty(){
    return (stackSize == 0):
    }

    public void clear(){
    stackSize = 0;
    }
}

EDIT: Here is the linked list implementation if anyone is interested..

public class StackList{
    private Node listHead;

    protected class Node{
    protected Object datum;
    protected Node next;

    public Node(Object o, Node n){
        datum = o;
        next = n;
    }
    }

    public StackList(){
    listHead = null;
    }

    //public interface methods - push pop top empty clear
    public void push(Object o){
    listHead = new Node(o, listHead);
    }

    public Object pop()throws StackListException{
    if(listHead!=null){
        Object top = listHead.datum;
        listHead = listHead.next;
        return top;
    }else{
        throw new StackListException("Stack Underflow");
    }
    }

    public Object top()throws StackListException{
    if(listHead != null){
        return(listHead.datum);
    }else{
        throw new StackListException("Stack Underflow");
    }
    }

    public boolean empty(){
    return (listHead == null);
    }

    public void clear(){
    listHead = null;
    }
}
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3  
Define "best"! What quality do you measure? Developing time? Clean code? Runtime performance? Memory usage? "Grade I get when I turn it in as Homework"? Elegance? Characters per line? –  Joachim Sauer Apr 5 '11 at 13:08
    
Do you want a stack (aka last-in-first-out / LIFO), or a queue (first-in-first-out)? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 5 '11 at 13:13
    
is this homework? –  bguiz Apr 5 '11 at 13:28
    
in pop method , wouldn't be nice if the returned item "NEXT" is set to null ?? –  dekdev Jan 17 '13 at 18:43
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming you genuinely want to do this from scratch rather than using one of the perfectly good existing stack implementations then I would recommend:

  • Create a "MyStack< T >" class which implements any interfaces you want (perhaps List < T >?)
  • Within MyStack create a "private static final class Node< T >" inner class for each linked list item. Each node contains a reference to an object of type T and a reference to a "next" Node.
  • Add a "topOfStack" Node reference to MyStack.
  • The push and pop operations just need to operate on this topOfStack Node. If it is null, the Stack is empty. I'd suggest using the same method signatures and semantics as the standard Java stack, to avoid later confusion.....
  • Finally implement any other methods you need. For bonus points, implement "Iterable< T >" in such a way that it remembers the immutable state of the stack at the moment the iterator is created without any extra storage allocations (this is possible :-) )
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thanks i got it working, but i created my own node class instead. –  user559142 Apr 5 '11 at 13:44
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Why don't you just use the Stack implementation already there?

Or better (because it really a linked list, its fast, and its thread safe): LinkedBlockingDeque

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Since this is not a linked list implementation, but array-based, maybe? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 5 '11 at 13:12
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Use the STL adapter std::stack. Why? Because the code you don't have to write is the fastest way to completion of your task. stack is well-tested, and likely to not need any attention from you. Why not? Because there are some special-purpose requirements needed by your code, undocumented here.

By default stack uses a deque double-ended queue, but it merely requires the underlying container to support "Back Insertion Sequence", also known as .push_back.

typedef std::stack< myType, std::list<myType> > myStackOfTypes;
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If you're talking about a single linked list (a node has a reference to the next object, but not the previous one), then the class would look something like this :

public class LinkedListStack {

    private LinkedListNode first = null;
    private LinkedListNode last = null;
    private int length = 0;

    public LinkedListStack() {}

    public LinkedListStack(LinkedListNode firstAndOnlyNode) {
        this.first = firstAndOnlyNode;
        this.last = firstAndOnlyNode;
        this.length++;
    }

    public int getLength() {
        return this.length;
    }

    public void addFirst(LinkedListNode aNode) {
        aNode.setNext(this.first);
        this.first = aNode;
    }

}

public class LinkedListNode {

    private Object content = null;
    private LinkedListNote next = null;

    public LinkedListNode(Object content) {
        this.content = content;
    }

    public void setNext(LinkedListNode next) {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public LinkedListNode getNext() {
        return this.next;
    }

    public void setContent(Object content) {
        this.content = content;
    }

    public Object getContent() {
        return this.content;
    }

}

Of course you will need to code the rest of the methods for it to work properly and effectively, but you've got the basics. Hope this helps!

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Here is a tutorial that implements stack in Java using linked list. It implements push and pop methods along with an iterator to iterate through stack items. Hope it will help.

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