Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following code works fine:

template<typename T>
struct Wrap {};

template<template <class> class OUT, typename IN>
void Extract (OUT<IN> *obj)
{ /* only class 'IN' is used in some way */ }

int main ()
{
  Wrap<int> obj;
  Extract(&obj);
}

But, I am passing a pointer argument to extract the outer type and inner type.

Is there any better way by which I can invoke the method with explicit template instantiation ? Extract<Wrap<int> > ();

Edit:

I will detail my question a bit more. This explains, why the easy answer like Extract<Wrap, int>(); is not possible. I am writing a text parser, for C++ code. Wherever, parser finds,

x = (Type) y; 

it should convert into,

x = Extract<Type> (y);

Now, the Type can be

  1. any normal type like, int* or A**
  2. some templatized template like Wrap<A>

Now, Extract() works different for both the cases. I have to figure out using template that, whether it's Extract<int*> or Extract<Wrap<int> >.

==> In simpler language, the method can be called:

  1. Extract<int*>()
  2. Extract<Wrap<int> >()

I can figure out if it's called in 1st case, but how can I figure out if it's called in 2nd case ? (provided that, I want to know internal type also).

share|improve this question
    
Can you actually give us an example that demonstrates the problem you're having rather than an orthogonal problem then? I can't quite grasp what you're really trying to do from your edited description. –  Mark B Apr 5 '11 at 14:21
    
@Mark B, I have edited the last section. Have tried my best to explain. Hope this works. –  iammilind Apr 5 '11 at 14:36
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How about Extract<Wrap, int> (&obj);?

But why do you want to specify it explicitly? Most of the time you'd rather have the compiler deduce the types for you automatically for simplicity.

EDIT: Have you considered just specializing for Wrap<U>?

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
struct Wrap {};

template <class T>
struct Foo
{
static void Extract()
{
    std::cout << "Base type" << std::endl;
    // Stuff
}
};

template <class U>
struct Foo<Wrap<U> >
{
static void Extract()
{
    std::cout << "Extract<Wrap<U> >" << std::endl;
    // Stuff for Wrap
}
};

int main ()
{
  Foo<int>::Extract();
  Foo<Wrap<int> >::Extract ();
}

If needed you can add a specialization for T* as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's partially right. Because, I need to make specialization for all the wrapper classes such as 'Wrap1', 'Wrap2'. Even, I had thought of enclosing the function inside a struct and do something like, Foo<Type1>::Extract<Type2>(). But wanted to know, if we can do simply without using enclosing class. –  iammilind Apr 5 '11 at 15:09
    
@iammilind You can't partially specialized a function based on the Wrap<T> which is why I had to create the wrapper class to contain it. –  Mark B Apr 6 '11 at 12:15
add comment

This works fine

template<typename T>
struct Wrap {};

template<template <class> class OUT, typename IN>
void Extract ()
{
    IN x; // IN => int
} 

int main ()
{
  Wrap<int> obj;
  Extract<Wrap, int>();
}

You certainly lack basic understanding of C++ templates. Read the book C++ Templates - The Complete Guide.

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you feel I "lack basic understanding of C++ templates" ? –  iammilind Apr 5 '11 at 14:16
    
@iammilind : That's because you were tring to pass Wrap<int> as the template argument where you should have written Wrap. No offense meant BTW. Your question is much more clear now. –  Prasoon Saurav Apr 5 '11 at 14:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.