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        printf("\nframe is: %p",&frame);
        printf("\nframeprev is: %p",&framePrev);

whatever line comes first will always correctly print. The second line will always segfault in the above code, regardless of which pointer it is printing. any ideas whythis is? I have tried fflush( stdout ); after each printf but this seems to make no difference.

the pointer is delcaired using the following

frame =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double));
framePrev =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double));

if(frame==NULL||framePrev==NULL){
    printf("malloc epic fail\n");
    return 0;
}

/*allocate mem for 2nd dimention*/

for(i=0;i<cols;i++){
    frame[i]=(double*) malloc(rows*sizeof(double));
    framePrev[i]=(double*) malloc(rows*sizeof(double));
    /*check for null pointer*/
    if(frame[i]==NULL||framePrev[i]==NULL){
        printf("malloc epic fail\n");
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Try a debugger like gdb or a memory debugging tool like valgrind. They'll probably show exactly where you are segfaulting very quickly. –  Dave Goodell Apr 5 '11 at 13:54
    
Do you mean to say that the printf()s come after the main code? –  user82238 Apr 5 '11 at 13:54
    
The printfs are at the top a for loop which comes after the mallocs, but on the first execution of the loop it reports a segfault inbetweeen the 2 printfs - so maybe it is just that it is segfaulting after and printf is slow, im not too sure –  user692898 Apr 5 '11 at 14:01
    
frame N is: 0xbffff368 Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. is the output I get, and I would normally expect a second statement to be printed below –  user692898 Apr 5 '11 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

I don't know why that code you provided would segfault. However, what you're trying to print out is the address of the pointer, not the contents of the pointer. In other words, frame is a pointer variable; it is 4 bytes big and lives on the stack/heap somewhere. You're printing out the address of that somewhere. What I think you want is to print the value of frame; which would be the actual pointer that frame holds. So take off the & in each line and see what you get.

Also, your memory allocation is strange. A (double **) is a pointer to an array that holds pointers to doubles; but your malloc call allocates an array that holds doubles. You probably want malloc(cols * sizeof(double *)). This code works, because double is bigger than double *, so you actually allocate enough memory, but it's still wrong.

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1  
Yep that's the bug, should be double* in the allocation for the pointer-to-pointer. No wonder it crashes. –  Lundin Apr 5 '11 at 14:05

There is nothing wrong with your printf statements. If you're segfaulting, its probably because you have a bug in your routines and have smashed memory.

One obvious problem in what you posted is that your frame and frameprev arrays are not arrays of doubles, but double pointers, and its unlikely that they are the same size. The first two lines should be:

frame =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double *));
framePrev =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double *));
share|improve this answer
    
A float typically fits into a register, e.g. is the length of the native int, e.g. the size of a pointer. A double is indeed longer. –  user82238 Apr 5 '11 at 14:13

just throw the code into a test.cpp file like this:

int main(){

    int i, cols=4, rows=2;
    double **frame =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double));
    double **framePrev =(double**) malloc(cols*sizeof(double));

    if(frame==NULL||framePrev==NULL){
        printf("malloc epic fail\n");
        return 0;
    }

    /*allocate mem for 2nd dimention*/
    for(i=0;i<cols;i++){
        frame[i]=(double*) malloc(rows*sizeof(double));
        framePrev[i]=(double*) malloc(rows*sizeof(double));
        /*check for null pointer*/
        if(frame[i]==NULL||framePrev[i]==NULL){
            printf("malloc epic fail\n");
            return 0;
        }
    }

    printf("\nframe is: %p",&frame);
    printf("\nframeprev is: %p",&framePrev);
}

compiled via g++ test.cpp, run it via ./a.out ->

frame is: 0x7fff5fbffaf8
frameprev is: 0x7fff5fbffaf0

there is no segfaulting at all.

how to you compile? any other changes to your code now shown in your post? how do you initialize your variables?

regs.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for all the help guys, it really helped, you guys were right, that code was fine, it was the next line causing the problems, it just stoped the final print from making it onto the terminal (doh! - my bad). –  user692898 Apr 5 '11 at 15:11

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