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I had the following code in a jQuery plugin I was writing to make a tag cloud. I'm passing in a an array of data in the format [{tag: "028", count: 15}, {tag: "101", count: 357}]. I'm creating the cloud as spans for now, normalizing the size based on the count. The spans are created properly, i.e. they have the correct size and text. I added a couple of events, click and mouse events. No matter what span is clicked on, it always shows me the alert for the last element in the array.

While trying to debug what was going on, I extracted the element creation code to a seperate function. Once I did that, the click event worked properly, i.e. the click event shows the correct data for what span was clicked.

I assumed that both versions would produce the same results. Why did the click event work once I extracted the element creation to it's own function?

This is the version that did NOT work:

for (var i = 0; i < tagList.length; ++i) {
    if (tagList[i] != null) {
        var tagValue = tagList[i].tag;
        var tagCount = tagList[i].count;
        var size = getNormalizedSize(tagCount);
        var theSpan = getText(tagValue, tagCount);   // <span style="font-size: {1}em">{0}<\/span>
        var theAlert = getAlert(tagValue, tagCount); // "Project {0} is has logged in {1} drawings"
        var newElement = $(theSpan);
        newElement.click(function() {
            alert(theAlert);                        // Always shows data from last element in array
        }).mouseenter(function(event) {
            $(this).css('backgroundColor', '#FFC');
        }).mouseleave(function() {
            $(this).css('backgroundColor', '#FFF');
        });
        this.append(newElement).append(" ");
    }
}

This is the version that worked:

for (var i = 0; i < tagList.length; ++i) {
    if (tagList[i] != null) {
        var tagValue = tagList[i].tag;
        var tagCount = tagList[i].count;
        var tagElem = buildElement(tagValue, tagCount);
        this.append(tagElem).append(" ");
    }
}

function buildElement(tagValue, tagCount) {
    var size = getNormalizedSize(tagCount);
    var theSpan = getText(tagValue, tagCount);   // <span style="font-size: {1}em">{0}<\/span>
    var theAlert = getAlert(tagValue, tagCount); // "Project {0} is has logged in {1} drawings"
    var newElement = $(theSpan);
    newElement.click(function() {
        alert(theAlert);
    }).mouseenter(function(event) {
        $(this).css('backgroundColor', '#FFC');
    }).mouseleave(function() {
        $(this).css('backgroundColor', '#FFF');
    });
    return newElement;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because the two solutions have different scoping rules. In the first there is no function call, which means that theAlert is defined only once and you're simply updating the reference that the click callback handler refers to. In the second you're creating a new scope by calling buildElement, which in this case means that theAlert is defined for every tag in the list and is only updated when it's defined, so each click closure refers to different variables.

The key here is that the variables inside the closures (e.g. click callback) are not resolved until they are run. Here's a simple example that illustrates this:

var name = 'John';
setTimeout(function(){ alert(name); }, 1000);
name = 'Joe';

So even though when the closure referencing name is created before the value has changed, it isn't actually run until later, so the name that will be alerted is "Joe" and not "John".

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Thanks, I was missing that key. Learn something new every day, especially on this site. –  xecaps12 Apr 5 '11 at 15:04

You are capturing the same variable, scoped to the loop, in each of the handlers. Then when the handler is invoked it contains the last value assigned to it. When you move it to a function, the variable is scoped to that instance of the function invocation and thus it is different for each iteration of the loop and has the value assigned during that iteration.

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