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This is a two part question. I'm needing to restrict a rails site that I'm throwing on development server to only a few IP addresses, so the public can't access it. (Basic HTTP auth doesn't 'entirely' work as the auth breaks a Flash uploader in the project.)

Based on what I've Googled, this is what I've come up with in my routes file...

class WhitelistConstraint
  def initialize
    @ips = '127.0.0.1'
  end

  def matches?(request)
    @ips.include?(request.remote_ip)
  end
end

MyProject::Application.routes.draw do
  constraints WhitelistConstraint.new do
     # all my routing stuff here
  end
end

Works pretty good. However, I need to modify this in order to work with several IP addresses. I tried using a array on @ips, as well as looping through an each loop, but neither worked.

On top of that, the second part of my question...I may need to check only against a segment of the IP, like '127.0.0'. How would I do that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I didn't know you could do this through routes, my approach would be to just have a before_filter in the ApplicationController and just have something that does:

before_filter :protect

def protect
  @ips = ['127.0.0.1', '203.123.10.1'] #And so on ...]
  if not @ips.include? request.remote_ip
     # Check for your subnet stuff here, for example
     # if not request.remote_ip.include?('127.0,0')
     render :text => "You are unauthorized"
     return
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know you could either. However, this solution worked right away for me and probably the better route to go. Could see it being an issue on going from development to production (which is temporarily the staging server), but it's only temporary and I can just add the IPs on both environments as needed. Thanks. –  Shannon Apr 5 '11 at 15:45
    
You can use Rails.env.production? and Rails.env.development? to check the environment in some sort of if construct to suit whatever you need to do. Good Luck :) –  Fareesh Vijayarangam Apr 5 '11 at 15:49
    
Would this solution work for IP ranges? –  DanielCW Aug 29 '12 at 16:18
    
I suppose you could use this solution in conjunction with mine stackoverflow.com/questions/3518365/… –  Fareesh Vijayarangam Aug 30 '12 at 12:53

It is also possible to surround your route declaration with a scope like so:

scope :constraints => lambda{|req|%w(127.0.0.1).include? req.remote_addr} do

  ... your beautiful routes

end
share|improve this answer

what about using NetAddr::CIDR?

and something like this?

class WhitelistConstraint
  def initialize
    @ips = []
    @ips << NetAddr::CIDR.create('127.0.0.0/8')
    @ips << NetAddr::CIDR.create('192.168.0.0/16')
  end

  def matches?(request)
    valid = @ips.select {|cidr| cidr.contains?(request.remote_ip) }
    !valid.empty?
   end
 end

 MyProject::Application.routes.draw do
    constraints WhitelistConstraint.new do
     # all my routing stuff here
     end
 end 

This way you can specify the blocks of IPs that should be whitelisted, and not have to worry about the partial matches?

>> require 'netaddr'
=> true
>> @ips = []
=> []
>> @ips << NetAddr::CIDR.create('127.0.0.0/8')
=> [127.0.0.08]
>> @ips << NetAddr::CIDR.create('192.168.0.0/16')
=> [127.0.0.08, 192.168.0.016]
>> @ips.select { |c| c.contains? '192.168.10.1' }
=> [192.168.0.016]
>> @ips.select { |c| c.contains? '192.169.10.1' }
=> []
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't work for me, got a 'uninitialized constant WhitelistConstraint::NetAddr' error. –  Shannon Apr 5 '11 at 15:44
    
You will need to add the NetAddr Gem to you Gemfile if using rails 3 and do the bundle dance :) or Update your gem config if on rails 2. –  Doon Apr 5 '11 at 16:42
    
Ah okay, that makes sense. Found an alternative solution above and is probably better as this is only a "temporary" thing for internal testing, but I'll keep the above in mind if I need something more complex. –  Shannon Apr 5 '11 at 16:51
    
Thanks Doon that gem is just what I was looking for to deal with my subnet masks in Rails. –  genkilabs Aug 15 '12 at 21:48

Or simply use apache's .htaccess:

  1. Add the following to the http.conf or whatever conf file you have for apache and your rails app

AllowOverride all

  1. Create a file .htaccess in the rails folder and add the following
Allow from xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Deny from all
share|improve this answer
    
Had tried this first with no success, and it was researching rails .htaccess that someone suggested using routes instead, which is what led me to the above. However, now that you mention it, I may not have had the AllowOverride all in my http.conf. –  Shannon Apr 5 '11 at 15:43
    
So did it work? –  Syed Ali Apr 6 '11 at 18:32
    
I haven't had time to give it a try as I went with another solution, but there is going to be a point in the project where I will need the .htaccess file, so this will come in handy then. –  Shannon Apr 8 '11 at 13:44
    
I finally did get .htaccess to work by editing Passenger's vhost file and adding AllowOverride all in there, and adding the .htaccess as above. –  Shannon Apr 9 '11 at 2:47

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