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I believe I have a problem with rspec let and scoping. I can use the methods defined with let in examples (the "it" blocks), but not outside (the describe block where I did the let).

5   describe Connection do
8     let(:connection) { described_class.new(connection_settings) }
9 
10    it_behaves_like "any connection", connection
24  end

When I try to run this spec, I get the error:

connection_spec.rb:10: undefined local variable or method `connection' for Class:0xae8e5b8 (NameError)

How can I pass the connection parameter to the it_behaves_like?

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5 Answers 5

let() is supposed to be scoped to the example blocks and unusable elsewhere. You don't actually use let() as parameters. The reason it does not work with it_behaves_like as a parameter has to do with how let() gets defined. Each example group in Rspec defines a custom class. let() defines an instance method in that class. However, when you call it_behaves_like in that custom class, it is calling at the class level rather than from within an instance.

I've used let() like this:

shared_examples_for 'any connection' do
  it 'should have valid connection' do
    connection.valid?
  end
end

describe Connection do
  let(:connection) { Connection.new(settings) }
  let(:settings) { { :blah => :foo } }
  it_behaves_like 'any connection'
end

I've done something similar to bcobb's answer, though I rarely use shared_examples:

module SpecHelpers
  module Connection
    extend ActiveSupport::Concern

    included do
      let(:connection) { raise "You must override 'connection'" }
    end

    module ClassMethods
      def expects_valid_connection
        it "should be a valid connection" do
          connection.should be_valid
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

describe Connection do
  include SpecHelpers::Connection

  let(:connection) { Connection.new }

  expects_valid_connection
end

The definition of those shared examples are more verbose than using shared examples. I guess I find "it_behave_like" being more awkward than extending Rspec directly.

Obviously, you can add arguments to .expects_valid_connections

I wrote this to help a friend's rspec class: http://ruby-lambda.blogspot.com/2011/02/agile-rspec-with-let.html ...

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Redacted -- completely whiffed on my first solution. Ho-Sheng Hsiao gave a great explanation as to why.

You can give it_behaves_like a block like so:

describe Connection do
  it_behaves_like "any connection" do
    let(:connection) { described_class.new(connection_settings) }
  end
end
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I do "shared_examples_for" any connection" do |connection|". The error is on line 10, where it tries it first encounters "connection", before it reaches the shared examples. The second solution would duplicate the code, because I need the code by let(:connection) in the examples in connection_spec also. –  Costi Apr 5 '11 at 18:15
    
This is by far the better answer. –  robomc Jan 29 '13 at 3:58

I've discovered that if you do not explicitly pass the parameter declared by let, it will be available in the shared example.

So:

describe Connection do
  let(:connection) { described_class.new(connection_settings) }

  it_behaves_like "any connection"
end

connection will be available in the shared example specs

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I found what works for me:

   describe Connection do
     it_behaves_like "any connection", new.connection
     # new.connection: because we're in the class context 
     # and let creates method in the instance context, 
     # instantiate a instance of whatever we're in
   end
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Does RSpec monkeypatch new to do this? –  Andrew Grimm Apr 10 '11 at 23:13

This works for me:

  describe "numbers" do

    shared_examples "a number" do |a_number|
      let(:another_number) {
        10
      }

      it "can be added to" do
        (a_number + another_number).should be > a_number
      end

      it "can be subtracted from" do
        (a_number - another_number).should be < a_number
      end
    end

    describe "77" do
      it_should_behave_like "a number", 77
    end

    describe "2" do
      it_should_behave_like "a number", 2
    end
  end
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