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The situation: I have a library which I want to license under GPL/proprietary licenses. GPL version is in public repo.

  • Do I need separate proprietary repo which will differ from GPL one only in license text in the source files?

  • Or can I get away with fancy license text which will state dual licensing nature of the source and contain both GPL text and link to the product licensing page?

  • Or will it be OK to just give permission to use GPL version to the particular person/organization?

Personally I think that dual repo approach is the safest. However having two repos creates burden, because I will need to periodically sync repos replacing license text during the process.

UPD. Example of dual license source header that I found: http://www.mail-archive.com/debian-legal@lists.debian.org/msg36648.html

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I don't remember any open source program / library that does this, but I've seen the dual-license-in-the-same-file approach a few times. –  Carlos Campderrós Apr 5 '11 at 15:50
    
Perhaps if you explain why you want to use more than one license for the same source code, it would better help us guide your decision. –  Bernard Apr 5 '11 at 16:35
    
@Carlos Campderrós Can you remember which software had such licenses, please? Because I only found one example (see upd. in the question). –  beetoom Apr 8 '11 at 5:29
    
@Bernard Basically, I want to get in both worlds: open-source world with GPL version and commercial world with proprietary version. The reason why one would prefer proprietary license is the requirements of GPL. Generally, the code don't need to be precisely the same, one version (proprietary) can be features-ahead, for example. –  beetoom Apr 8 '11 at 5:30

2 Answers 2

Technically you will have one original source code that you package/distribute/license under different terms.

Just think about having source-code that is differently licensed.

One of the easiest thing to do is to create a packaging script that can package your source from the repository into a package under a certain license, e.g. by adding the specified COPYING file and by setting the right headers / copyright statement(s).

This is normally some file copy (e.g. cp) and search and replace operation (e.g. sed).

Do I need separate proprietary repo which will differ from GPL one only in license text in the source files?

In my opinion you don't need that if there is no difference in the source-code but only in the licensing.

Can I get away with fancy license text which will state dual licensing nature of the source and contain both GPL text and link to the product licensing page?

I have no clue why you write "away" here. If you're looking for an easy way, I suggest a script doing the work for you so you even have a normalized processing in such a task.

Will it be OK to just give permission to use GPL version to the particular person/organization?

If you own all rights of the code, you can do that, looks like a proper way of licensing to me. If you need information about how to apply the GPL onto your programs, you find more helpful information here: How to use GNU licenses for your own software

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Yes, distributing GPL version as an archive is a valid option, I've seen this approach. However, it makes contribution difficult. Originally I was planning to put GPL version to GitHub and accept pull requests from contributors. –  beetoom Apr 8 '11 at 5:08
    
You can ask contributors to give you more rights on the contributions they provide, e.g. to have it available under the second license as well. Or even more, like nearly all rights, just that you can choose licensing terms on your own and claim copyright to the full extend of law. Normally contributors do if you in exchange publish their changes to the public. –  hakre Apr 8 '11 at 6:55

Just have one repository. Having two repositories is not smart.

Just put your software under GPL in that repository. And state that the software is under a dual license model (GPL and Commercial) and buying commercial license from you(r company) means that GPL does not apply.

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I'm also thinking about this option. Two repositories are indeed an overkill. However, this option revolves around 'fancy' license text, which will state dual licensing nature of the source. Do you have examples of such a license? I only found one example (see upd. in the question). –  beetoom Apr 8 '11 at 5:36
    
Have one repository and use GPL license. In your web site (where you will put a download link to your library or download link to your source code) state that it's under dual license model. That's it. As an example: check iText license page: itextpdf.com/terms-of-use/index.php and their source code is available with AGPL on sourceforge: sourceforge.net/projects/itext –  JCasso Apr 8 '11 at 7:27
    
But remember, any copyright of any contribution belongs to the author of that contribution by default. For example if you wrote a pdf library, and some other guy wrote a convertToWordFile method, copyright of this method is his not yours. So you cannot remove GPL from that method. You can license your work whatever you want but that method has to remain GPL'ed. [TINLA] –  JCasso Apr 8 '11 at 7:35

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