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I've read several posts on this problem but none of the answers seem to work for me. Here is the situation--I have a generic function to call in another class:

public class Dispatcher<T> where T : Event {
    public void Notify<X>(X tEvent) where X : Event {
        if (someField is IListener<X, T>) {
             //this never executes--X is Event regardless of its derived type
        }
    }
}

and the calling code:

public class Effect {
    public Event myEvent;

    public CallNotify() {
        Dispatcher.Notify(myEvent);
    }
}

The problem is that Event has dozens of derived types, and I need the Notify() call to happen with the derived type as X. So far, it just calls Notify< Event >() no matter what kind of Event I pass in. The only solution that compiles is to call Notify(myEvent as DerivedEvent), but that has to be hardcoded for every single type--not acceptable.

A similar function infers properly if I give it a "this" pointer from an instance of the derived class.

Surely there's a solution using Reflection here.

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Can't you use an Interface? –  Tony The Lion Apr 5 '11 at 16:00
    
Can you give more example code? I dont see how OtherClass relates to Dispatcher. The compiler will auto fill in the generic parameter on the Notify method to be Event because myEvent is the Event type. You would have to call it from somewhere else that has the explicit type of myEvent to call the Notify method with the generic parameters you want –  BrandonAGr Apr 5 '11 at 16:39
    
Dispatcher is OtherClass, sorry. I have edited the question. You put the problem very succinctly. In order to call Notify() from somewhere else, I would probably need to write a function for every single derived class. I used that approach for a similar function: Register<X>(this) works just fine, called from each class that implements IListener<X,T>. But that code...seems more necessary and less like boilerplate/overhead. I'll try this approach –  MrEff Apr 5 '11 at 17:37
    
If it matters, I'll give some background: I made my own event system. It's all in one big class, so the types of events are specified using type parameters. To be an observer, any class can implement IListener<X, Event> where X is some type of event. The advantages are that the Events are organized using inheritance, so you can easily listen for an entire class of Event, and the client code is minimal. The reason it's all so messy is that I wrote it in C# 3.5 without the help of co- and contra- variance. Even so, it should be completely typesafe, compiler enforced. –  MrEff Apr 5 '11 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to call it as you seem to expect you would have to use reflection to generate a method of the actual type of myEvent. But I would stress that doing the following is a BAD idea and probably means your design needs to be rethought out.

MethodInfo openGenericMethod = OtherClass.GetType().GetMethod("Notify");
MethodInfo closedGenericMethod = openGenericMethod.MakeGenericMethod(myEvent.GetType());

closedGenericMethod.Invoke(OtherClass, new object[]{ myEvent });, 

I didn't actually test the above code, but it would look something like that

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This looks like exactly what I wanted. I will test it. –  MrEff Apr 5 '11 at 17:44

You've got two issues.

First, your generics are leaking. Whenever you need to determine what type a particular instance is, your function is no longer generic. Consider your design flawed and re-examine what you are trying to do.

Second, IListener<X,Y> is not a type. Generics aren't generic in .NET; the runtime determines all actual types your application will require and creates them. The runtim will create, for example, a type IListener<int,string> if you actually use that in your application.

var foo = new List<int>();
var bar = foo.GetType() == typeof(List<>);

In this examle, bar is false.

Even with all this, yes, it is possible. You just have to understand how reflection with generic type definitions works. This is a pretty good link at MSDN that explains how it works.

I would strongly suggest that you reconsider using generics in this manner. Sometimes abstraction ad absurdum isn't the best thing...

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The runtime creates the generic types, not the compiler. Which is why you can create a new closed generic type at runtime –  BrandonAGr Apr 5 '11 at 16:37
    
@BrandonAGr: true that. Editing. –  Will Apr 5 '11 at 16:38
    
Well I suppose it is a leak, but it's a small leak. I only need to know the derived type to decide which IListener gets notified. The only way I could see to avoid "leaking" is to make a separate Dispatcher instance for each type of Event, which would defeat the purpose--minimal coding effort for the client. I'm reading your link now –  MrEff Apr 5 '11 at 16:43

Could you just drop the constraint and check to make sure it derives from Event, like this:

public class Dispatcher<T> where T : Event {
    public void Notify<X>(X tEvent) {
        if(typeof(tEvent).IsSubclassOf(typeof(Event))
        {
            if (someField is IListener<X, T>) {
                //this never executes--X is Event regardless of its derived type
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think so. I would have to change the code in several places, and it would sacrifice compile-time checking of the argument types. I'm not certain it would work even then. –  MrEff Apr 5 '11 at 16:35

So I seem to have figured out a workaround on the other end. Instead of

public class Dispatcher<T> where T : Event {
    public void Notify<X>(X tEvent) where X : Event {
        foreach (Object l in listeners) {
            if (l is IListener<X, T>) { //never true
                (l as IListener<X, T>).OnEvent();
            }
        }
    }
}

I have this mishmash:

public class Dispatcher<T> where T : Event {
    public void Notify<X>(X tEvent) where X : Event {
        foreach (Object l in listeners) {
            foreach (Type t in l.GetType().GetInterfaces()) {
                Type[] temp = t.GetGenericArguments();
                if (temp.Count() > 0 && temp[0] == tEvent.GetType()) {
                    MethodInfo mi = t.GetMethod("OnEvent", new Type[] {tEvent.GetType()});
                    mi.Invoke(l, new object[] { tEvent });
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This seems to work although I don't like having to test every interface (Windows Forms have at least 10 interfaces). I'm going to try the solution from BrandonAGr

share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiosity, what class is Event here? I see no Event class in System namespace. I see System.EventHandler and System.EventArgs. I do not see System.Event. Is Event something you made up yourself? If not, then what is it's fully qualified namespace name? It seems like it should be trivial to, with a generic container object like your Event, access the contained object and check its type directly, which would alleviate the confusion you're having here trying to find out information about what is inside the envelope without looking at any contents. –  user645280 Jun 30 '14 at 17:54

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