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class Student
{
  public string ID { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
}

Student[] students = new Student[10];
int j = 0;

for(int i=0; i < 100; i++)
{
  if (some condition)
  {
    student[j].ID = anotherIDlist[i]; //some value from another list;
    student[j].Name = anotherNamelist[i]; //some value from another list;
    j++;
  }
}

Here I don't know the array length. Need it dynamic depending on the total conditions are true. Is there any efficient way of doing the same using Generic List? If so, how to do so?

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Is this homework? –  Stuart Apr 5 '11 at 16:08
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your coding style is reasonable and common, but notice how imperative it is. You're saying "go around this loop, mutate this collection, change this variable", building the machine that does what you want. When given the choice I prefer to code in a declarative style, and let the compiler build the machine for me. I would be inclined to write your program like this:

var query = from i in Enumerable.Range(0, 100)
            where some_condition
            select new Student() { Id = ids[i], Name = names[i] };
var students = query.ToList();

Let the compiler worry about the loops and variables and whatnot; you can concentrate on the semantics rather than the mechanisms.

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thanks Eric, this seems to be efficient way to go about it. –  kuul13 Apr 6 '11 at 12:30
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This is really basic stuff:

var students = new List<Student>();

for(int i=0; i < 100; i++)
{
    if (some condition)
    {
        // You can produce the student to add any way you like, e.g.:
        someStudent = new Student { ID = anotherIDlist[i], Name = anotherNamelist[i] };
        students.Add(someStudent);
    }
}
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Jon, I implemented your solution but then I saw Eric's and changed my code that way. But still your solution was little simpler :) –  kuul13 Apr 6 '11 at 12:31
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List<Students> students = new List<Students>;

for(int i=0; i < 100; i++)
{
  if (some condition)
  {
    students.Add(new Student { .ID = anotherIDlist[i], .Name = anotherNamelist[i]));
  }
}
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Just replace

Student[] students = new Student[10];

with

List<Student> students = new List<Student();

and the loop with:

  if (some condition)
  {
    Student student = new Student();
    student.ID = anotherIDlist[i]; //some value from another list;
    student.Name = anotherNamelist[i]; //some value from another list;
    students.Add(student);
    j++;
  }
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Yes a generic List<Student> will work great here.

List<Student> students = new List<Student>();
for(int i=0; i < 100; i++)
{
  if (some condition)
  {
    Student s = new Student();
    s.ID = anotherIDlist[i]; //some value from another list;
    s.Name = anotherNamelist[i]; //some value from another list;
    students.Add(s);
  }
}
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If you want a similar syntax :

ArrayList

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