Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public static String asHex (byte buf[]) {
    StringBuffer strbuf = new StringBuffer(buf.length * 2);
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < buf.length; i++) {
        if (((int) buf[i] & 0xff) < 0x10)
            strbuf.append("0");

        strbuf.append(Long.toString((int) buf[i] & 0xff, 16));
    }

    return strbuf.toString();
}
share|improve this question
    
Check here for couple of good methods to do this. –  amit Feb 25 '09 at 5:56

2 Answers 2

Here's a complete program which includes the asBytes() function which is what I assume you were looking for, the opposite to asHex():

public class Temp {
    public static String asHex (byte buf[]) {
        StringBuffer strbuf = new StringBuffer(buf.length * 2);
        int i;
        for (i = 0; i < buf.length; i++) {
            if (((int) buf[i] & 0xff) < 0x10)
                strbuf.append("0");
            strbuf.append(Long.toString((int) buf[i] & 0xff, 16));
        }
       return strbuf.toString();
    }
    public static byte[] asBytes (String s) {
        String s2;
        byte[] b = new byte[s.length() / 2];
        int i;
        for (i = 0; i < s.length() / 2; i++) {
            s2 = s.substring(i * 2, i * 2 + 2);
            b[i] = (byte)(Integer.parseInt(s2, 16) & 0xff);
        }
        return b;
    }
    static public void main(String args[]) {
        byte[] b = Temp.asBytes("010203040506070809fdfeff");
        String s = Temp.asHex(b);
        System.out.println (s);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

To get a hexadecimal string representation of a byte array, you could use String.format() with the %X format specifier:

public static String asHex(byte buf[]) 
{
    StringBuffer strbuf = new StringBuffer(buf.length * 2);

    for (byte b : buf)
       strbuf.append(String.format("%02X", b));

    return strbuf.toString();
}

The following method gives the inverse operation, returning a byte array representation of a hexadecimal string. It uses Byte.parseByte() and some bit shifting to get two characters in one byte:

public static byte[] asBytes(String str)
{
    if ((str.length() % 2) == 1) str = "0" + str; // pad leading 0 if needed
    byte[] buf = new byte[str.length() / 2];
    int i = 0;

    for (char c : str.toCharArray())
    {
        byte b = Byte.parseByte(String.valueOf(c), 16);
        buf[i/2] |= (b << (((i % 2) == 0) ? 4 : 0));
        i++;
    }

    return buf;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks 4 giving this but i need hex to byte for the above program –  silvia Feb 17 '09 at 4:27
    
@silvia: Updated answer to include the inverse operation. –  Zach Scrivena Feb 17 '09 at 4:43
    
I have two questions: (1) When did Java introduce that for-statement syntax (it's nifty but my Eclipse flags error but it has 1.4)? (2) Why the hideous :-) bitshift, can't you just process two chars at a time? –  paxdiablo Feb 17 '09 at 4:59
    
@Pax: (1) for-each appeared in Java 1.5 java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/guide/language/foreach.html (2) Doesn't seem to work unfortunately; Byte.parseByte("FF",16) throws a NumberFormatException. –  Zach Scrivena Feb 17 '09 at 5:07
    
@Pax: Integer.parseInt() works nicely of course =) –  Zach Scrivena Feb 17 '09 at 5:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.