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folks, I am working on using Python re to parse a configuration file that contains lines like this: [VAR: abc123] ... ...

.CSIIND~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~0~~~

[VAR: def234]
...
<bunch of stuff>
...

.CSIIND~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~1~~~

...

I'm trying to build up to extracting something like this:

varname / CSIIND

abc123 / 0

def234 / 1

... ...

I don't have a lot of regex background, so I'm probably a bit slow on this, but I've been seeking out every tutorial and resource I can find, to no avail.

Please help me, at least with directional suggestions! I don't mean to ask for finished code!

The farthest I have gotten is this regex:

r"^[VAR:.+?].+?CSIIND",

which at least matches as many times as I expect it to, but I can't get it to match the number

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Please fix your formatting. Also please add more examples of input and the output you'd want from it –  Daenyth Apr 5 '11 at 16:35
    
Please format your code properly! –  Andreas Jung Apr 5 '11 at 16:36
    
I thought I had by indenting 4 spaces as the "ask question" form instructed. –  Doug Apr 5 '11 at 18:09
    
Try out your regex interactively with re-try: re-try.appspot.com –  chmullig Apr 5 '11 at 18:41
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2 Answers

Need more detail. Is the variable the "var" the thing enclosed in square brackets? With the name before the ":" and the value everything after? [foo:"Mr Bar's Foo shop"]

If so, you might just be able to split on the ":" rather than bothering with a complex regex.

Ok look at this:

import re
stuff0='[stuff:junk]'
stuff1=stuff0[1:-1]            # Knock off the brackets
stuff2=re.split(':', stuff)    # Split the name from value 
stuff3=stuff2[0]+'/'+stuff2[1] # Recombine into your requested format 
print stuff3
'stuff/junk'

I split that out into many lines for clarity. You could pull several steps into one line.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Skip, however what I really want to extract is more like: junk / 1, junk2 / 2 junk3 / 0 –  Doug Apr 5 '11 at 22:31
    
Doug that is a pretty trivial change over what I gave. Do you want a string in the format you describe? Just initialise the string before looping through the file {stuffstring = ''} then append each line item to it as you go {stuffstring += stuff3}. Or you could build a dictionary with it {dictionary[stuff2[0]] = stuff2[2] or just about whatever you need. What are you eventually trying to do with the data? –  Skip Huffman Apr 6 '11 at 11:11
    
Skip: really, thanks for the effort and help. I am planning to feed the data to a spreadsheet, so ultimately am likely to land on CSV output for this. I've been thinking, too, that a dictionary based approach might be a better approach to this. I appreciate the help from everyone, even though it didn't really answer the question as asked; it was more of a rework of my entire approach. Thus, I still hope to figure out the regex one day even if I go in another direction for now. –  Doug Apr 6 '11 at 23:40
    
regex is a really powerful tool. I use them a lot. My whiteboard often features "Don't Fear The Regex" But they are a tool that isn't needed in all cases, they make code harder to read and slower to write. I mostly use them in two cases, when they make my code more efficient, and when they make my code more understandable. If you are going out to a spreadsheet, you might want to look at the csv module, included in the standard library, since it may do most of what you need in a clear fashion. No need to reinvent the wheel. –  Skip Huffman Apr 7 '11 at 11:32
    
Oh, and one other note, you might want to "accept" one of answers given as the best for your question. It is kind of how this site works. One person asks a question, others offer answers, and the original person "accepts" the one that fits best. Just click the checkmark on the left of the answer you want to accept. Good luck. –  Skip Huffman Apr 7 '11 at 11:33
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Maybe this is more than you asked for:

ch = '''[VAR: abc123]
hhhgfgfjhfghjf
... ...
.CSIIND~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~0~~~
[VAR: def234]
...
<bunch of stuff>
...
......
.CSIIND~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~1~~~
llhgjgj
[VAR: ab1587]
hhhgfgfjhfghjf
... ...
.Cosoo~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~120~~~
zhbyi,i,uy_o
[VAR: abc123]
hhhgfgfjhfghjf
... ...
.CUSUT~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~28~~~
[VAR: def234]
...
<bunch of stuff>
...
......
.CUSUT~~~LOCAL~~~I4~~~45~~~'''

import re
from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter

RE = ('\[([^:]+):\s+([^\]]+)\]\s*[\r\n]+'
      '(?:.+[\r\n]+)*?'
      '\.([^~\r\n]+?)~~~[^~]+~~~[^~]+~~~(\d+)~~~')

pat = re.compile(RE,re.MULTILINE)

li =  [ (k,[tuple(x)[1::2] for x in g]) for k,g in groupby(pat.findall(ch),key=itemgetter(2))]
for y in li:
        print y

result

('CSIIND', [('abc123', '0'), ('def234', '1')])
('Cosoo', [('ab1587', '120')])
('CUSUT', [('abc123', '28'), ('def234', '45')])

From li, you can deduct any presentation you want

share|improve this answer
    
It is; you're right: finished code that I don't understand. –  Doug Apr 5 '11 at 23:42
    
@Doug Will there be only one varname in the configuration files analysed, as CSIIND in your exemple ? If so, my code is doing too much and I can simplify my code I you wish. If not (that is to say several varnames in one file, like CSIIND,Cosoo,CUSUT in my exemple) do you want me to explain my code ? –  eyquem Apr 6 '11 at 0:09
    
There are a couple of dozen parameters for each. –  Doug Apr 6 '11 at 23:52
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