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Given this code:

function MyClass() {
    var v = '1';
    this.hi = function() {
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v);
        var v = '2';
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v);
        delete(v);
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v);
    }
}

When I do something like:

z = new MyClass();
z.hi();

The result I get is:

Value of V is undefined 
Value of V is 2
Value of V is 2

What I want to explain is why the result is like this.

  • Why V is undefined (The way I understand it - and it might not be right - is that in JS it's all definition-time, not run-time, so on definition the function had it's own variable "v", but it's not defined on the first line yet though).

  • Why V is not deleted? Kept the same value?

  • How do I access the "v" with value "1" from the "one-level-up"?

  • I know if I use different variable name in the "hi" function, I'll be able to "see" variable "v" with the value "1" in the function. So I am kind of hiding the original one, but that still leaves the question #3 -- how do I access the "top level one"?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

You can't delete a variable like that.

You can't access the v from the enclosing scope because the v in the inner scope "hides" it. Rename it.

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As to the why undefined part, what your code compiles to is:

function MyClass() {
    var v = '1';
    this.hi = function() {
        var v;
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v); // undefined!
        v = '2';
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v);
        delete(v);
        console.log('Value of V is ' + v);
    }
}

As you can see the var is declared at the beginning of the scope. This is how JS works. Run it through JSLint and see for yourself.

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Change it to this:

function MyClass() {
    this.v = '1';
...

And make sure you always use this function with New.

this refers to the object that the thing is a member of. So creating this.hi makes something in a scope totally unrelated to the function itself, but using this for all members makes them all part of the same object (to which the function is assigned).

http://jsfiddle.net/hHvUq/

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