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I currently have an application that's written in Java EE and a front-end site hosted in Joomla. I'm beginning a process of collapsing the 2 into a single Rails 3 application. However, this is going to be a very long and phased process.

I'm trying to figure out a Best Practice for handling the models in this case. For instance, the first phase is to migrate user registration. Currently this is handled in Java then Java populates the Joomla tables with the appropriate data. Rails is going to be taking over this function and populating its own database (devise) and cross-populating to the Java and Joomla databases.

As the project progresses and pieces of the former application are deprecated the models will be removed (if I live that long ; ).

I know there are a few ways of accessing multiple databases from within a rails application (that all boil down to the same, just how it's configured), but I'm trying to figure out the smartest way to go about it:

Should I just create mini-apps in /lib?

Should I use rails generators and create real rails models (ie. /app/models/old-app-name/)

How do I get everything to tie in?

So how would you handle this? I've got some stuff up and running but it's early in the project and what I've got is fairly messy. I'd really like to be able to generate rails models as in the 2nd option above, but am unsure exactly what the process would be as far as hooking all that up.

To make matters more interesting, I'm transitioning to BDD/TDD so I do want it all testable via RSpec2, etc.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, ok, then I'll just let everybody know what I did in the hopes that someone else will find it useful.

I decided to go with regular rails models with the external database configured in database.yml:

# MySQL.  Versions 4.1 and 5.0 are recommended.
#
# Install the MySQL driver:
#   gem install mysql
# On Mac OS X:
#   sudo gem install mysql -- --with-mysql-dir=/usr/local/mysql
# On Mac OS X Leopard:
#   sudo env ARCHFLAGS="-arch i386" gem install mysql -- --with-mysql-            config=/usr/local/mysql/bin/mysql_config
#       This sets the ARCHFLAGS environment variable to your native architecture
# On Windows:
#   gem install mysql
#       Choose the win32 build.
#       Install MySQL and put its /bin directory on your path.
#
# And be sure to use new-style password hashing:
#   http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/old-client.html
development:
  adapter: mysql
  encoding: utf8
  reconnect: false
  database: myapp_development
  pool: 5
  username: db_user
  password: db_pass  
  socket: /private/tmp/mysql.sock 

# Warning: The database defined as "test" will be erased and
# re-generated from your development database when you run "rake".
# Do not set this db to the same as development or production.
test:
  adapter: mysql
  encoding: utf8
  reconnect: false
  database: myapp_test
  pool: 5
  username: db_user
  password: db_pass  
  socket: /private/tmp/mysql.sock

production:
  adapter: mysql
  encoding: utf8
  reconnect: false
  database: my_app_production
  pool: 5
  username: db_user
  password: db_pass   
  socket: /private/tmp/mysql.sock 

## This is the external DB ##
external_app:
  adapter: mysql
  encoding: utf8
  reconnect: false
  database: external_db
  pool: 5
  username: db_user
  password: db_pass
  socket: /private/tmp/mysql.sock

Then create the models with the standard rails generator:

rails g model external_app_name/model_name --no-migrations

As the models are in an existing, non-rails db I don't want migrations, do what you want here.

This creates a basic empty model in app/models/external_app_name/model_name.rb which I then modify thusly:

class ExernalApp::ModelName < ActiveRecord::Base

  establish_connection :external_app # from database.yml
  set_table_name :external_app_table_name
  set_primary_key :id

end

From there you can continue development as though it was a normal rails model (which, of course, it is ; ).

This method will also create whatever tests and other junk that your normal generator creates so you can just move forward. Presumably you could also do this with a scaffold, etc if there was some good reason (wasn't for me, just need models).

NOTE:

This also creates a module in app/models/external_app.rb that looks like:

    module ExternalApp
      def self.table_name_prefix
        'external_app_'
      end
    end

Initially I set prefix to '' but doesn't seem to have any impact as created.

I know none of this is rocket science or even very far up the ladder of computer science, but it's an organizational/process thing that I think will keep life as easy and 'rails way' as possible during this part of the project.

Hope this helps!

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