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I am trying to package some of my Python code that calls R code using rpy2. That R code currently sits in a separate file which I source from the Python script. For example, if the python script is myscript.py, then the R code is stored in myscript_support.R, and I have something like the following in myscript.py:

from rpy2.robjects import *

# Load the R code
r.source(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), "myscript_support.R"))

# Call the R function
r[["myscript_R_function"]]()

I now want to package this Python script using setuptools, and I have a few questions:

  1. How should I package the R support code, and once I have done so, how do I find the path to the R file so I can source it?

  2. The R code depends on several R packages. How can I ensure that these are installed? Should I just raise an informative error if these R packages cannot be loaded?

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2 Answers

Well, imagine yourself as the setuptools packager and think of what you would expect the programmer to do.

  • Setuptools knows nothing about R, its files' structure or that your code uses them somehow.
  • Your R interpreter knows nothing about importing files from Python .egg's

For the first problem, you have two choices:

  1. Tell setuptools to just include some additional files without bothering what they are
  2. Teach setuptools about R, how to determine what R files your program uses and how to track and include their dependencies

The first option is implementable by passing include_package_data = True to setup() and providing masks of files to include in package_data (setuptools docs, "Including Data Files" section). Paths relative to packages' directories can be used. The files will be accessible at run time at the same relative paths through the "Resource Management API" ("Accessing Data Files at Runtime" section).

The second option would require you to add your code to setuptools before invoking setup(). For example, you may add a file finder to add relevant .R files to the results of find_packages(). Or just generate the list of files for the previous paragraph by arbitrary means.

For the second problem, the easiest way is to force setuptools to install the package as a directory rather than an .egg by specifying zip_safe = False. You might use eager_resources option instead that extracts a group of resources on demand ("Automatic Resource Extraction" section).

As for installing third-party R packages, an automatable technique is described at R Installation and Administration - Installing packages

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How should I package the R support code, and once I have done so, how do I find the path to the R file so I can source it?

For the source files to be installed, you need to specify them in some way in package_data. You can find their path in the exact same way as you do now.

The R code depends on several R packages. How can I ensure that these are installed? Should I just raise an informative error if these R packages cannot be loaded?

Either make setup.py check if they exist (kind of "configtools approach") or just raise some kind of exception once you cannot load them. Or maybe do both of them, and then if for some reason the files you depend on disappear, at least you will know it.

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My current solution for finding the R support code assumes that the python script and the R script reside in the same directory. I can use mymodule.__file__ instead of __file__ to make the path relative to the module, and not the wrapper script that setuptools will install in $PATH, but how do I figure out where setuptools is putting the module file and tell setuptools to install the R script in the same directory? Also, will any of thie work if the whole package is put inside an egg file? –  Ryan Thompson Apr 7 '11 at 17:58
    
Put the R files somewhere inside the module, and specify them in package_data. Like this, setuptools should install them at the exact same place (relative to the module). –  ubik Apr 8 '11 at 6:46
1  
As for the egg file, see peak.telecommunity.com/DevCenter/… –  ubik Apr 8 '11 at 6:52
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