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I wrote the following code to read a character array and print it.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<conio.h>
void read_array(char a[],int n);
void print_array(char a[],int n);
int main(void)
{
    char a[100];
    int n;
    printf("\nEnter n:");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    printf("\nEnter the characters:");
    read_array(a,n);
    printf("\nThe array now is: ");
    print_array(a,n);
    getch();
    return 0;
}

void read_array(char a[],int n)
{
     int i;
     for(i=0;i<n;i++)
         scanf("%c",&a[i]);

}
void print_array(char a[],int n)
{
     int i;
     for(i=0;i<n;i++)                
        printf("a[%d]=%c\n",i,a[i]);
}

Input:

Enter n:15  
Enter the characters:xxxxx     xxxxx  

Output:

The array now is:  
a[0]=    
a[1]=x    
a[2]=x    
a[3]=x    
a[4]=x    
a[5]=x    
a[6]=    
a[7]=    
a[8]=    
a[10]=    
a[11]=x    
a[12]=x   
a[13]=x    
a[14]=x    

Where in my input a[5] through a[9] are blank characters. So how come in the output a[0]=(a blank)?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure it's blank? Or does your output have a blank line between a[0]= and a[1]= –  Brian Roach Apr 5 '11 at 18:31
    
Rolled back. Input and output belong in quote blocks, not code blocks. –  GEOCHET Apr 5 '11 at 18:32
1  
@GEOCHET, says who? What if the I/O doesn't make sense without fixed-width formatting? Not to mention some highlighting comes for free with code blocks. Meta also seems to disagree with you: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/52502 –  Carl Norum Apr 5 '11 at 22:45
1  
@carl: Syntax highlighting is useless on non code blocks and <pre> works just fine for fixed width. –  GEOCHET Apr 6 '11 at 15:18
    
I have to go with @GEOCHET here, syntax highlighting is usually annoying for non-code blocks. However, pre tag was required here since the spacing is important in all those x's (so I added it). –  paxdiablo Jun 10 '11 at 0:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first character you're reading in is the newline you typed to enter the 15. Use fgets() and sscanf() - you'll be much happier.

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't scanf skip over all the whitespaces. –  user567797 Apr 5 '11 at 18:39
    
@user567797, that depends on how you use it, I guess. That's the normal use case, though. You can just use getch() for your second set of input if that makes it easier. –  Carl Norum Apr 5 '11 at 19:11
    
Actually, you don't need *scanf here (for the string anyway, you still need it for the number) since fgets will give you a string. And, if you're looking for a robust input method, see stackoverflow.com/questions/5130723/… –  paxdiablo Jun 10 '11 at 0:41

In the scanf function for getting the values of character use getche or getchar function. This will allow you to capture all the characters including new line. you can skip the first character and copy the rest.

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