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We are using autogenerated code (SubSonic3 with Repository pattern) with our code and there are many lines like this.

public IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup> GetAll()
    {
        var results = Database.Current.pStatusLookupLoadAll()
            .ExecuteTypedList<MyModels.StatusLookup>();
        if (results.IsNull()) yield break;
        foreach (var m in results)
        {
            ..Common logic lines...
            ..Common logic lines...
            yield return m;
        }
    }

What I would like to do is refactor out the yield lines into a common method. But I don't know if I can due to the way yield works.

Then when we have custom code that calls the db outside of the repository auto generated code I can then call this common method on the loaded model objects.

public IEnumerable<Books> GetByFancy(int anInteger)
{
    DB db = Database.Current;
    var r = from b in db.Books
            join a in db.Authors on b.AuthorId equals a.AuthorId
            where a.AuthorId == anInteger
            select b;

    if (r.IsNull()) yield break;
    foreach (var m in r)
    {
        m.AcceptChanges();
        yield return m;
    }
}

So the above example has the common repeat lines in it where I'd like to make a common method call to remove the common repeat code lines.


Here is the exception that I get.

System.InvalidCastException : Unable to cast object of type '<AcceptChangesAndYield>d__6' to type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1[MyModels.StatusLookup]'.

public IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup> GetAll()
{
    var results = Database.Current.pStatusLookupLoadAll()
        .ExecuteTypedList<MyModels.StatusLookup>();
    return (IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup>)results.AcceptChangesAndYield();
}

And here is the extension method that I tried this with.

public static class BaseModelExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<MyModels.BaseModel> AcceptChanges(this IEnumerable<MyModels.BaseModel> obj)
    {
        if (obj.IsNull()) yield break;
        foreach (var m in obj)
        {
            m.AcceptChanges();
            yield return m;
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<MyModels.Interfaces.ILookup> AcceptChangesAndYield(this IEnumerable<MyModels.Interfaces.ILookup> obj)
    {
        if (obj.IsNull()) yield break;
        foreach (var m in obj)
        {
            yield return m;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the question ? –  Yochai Timmer Apr 5 '11 at 19:02
    
What exactly are you asking? Why do you want the yields out and what do you want instead? –  Doggett Apr 5 '11 at 19:03
    
Yup, this question is pretty unclear at the moment. It's not clear what the two methods you're showing are like, or what the common logic lines operate on. –  Jon Skeet Apr 5 '11 at 19:05
    
The lines I'd like to replace with a common method call are: if (results.IsNull()) yield break; foreach (var m in results) { ..Common logic lines... ..Common logic lines... yield return m; } –  David W Apr 5 '11 at 19:32
    
In the second example, r will never be null (it may be an empty enumerable). Also, the join seems unecessary: from b in db.Books where b.AuthorId == anInteger select b –  Talljoe Apr 6 '11 at 3:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Update: Your problem is not related to the yield keyword specifically. It has to do with type variance.

Your AcceptChangesAndYield method returns an object of a type implementing IEnumerable<MyModels.Interfaces.ILookup> (in fact it is a compiler-generated type, but that's not really important). In your method call you are trying to downcast this to an IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup>, which is more specific.

The IEnumerable<T> interface is covariant which would allow you to upcast to a less specific type; e.g., you could cast from a List<string> to an IEnumerable<object> (in .NET 4.0, anyway). The type generated by the compiler to supply the return value of your AcceptChangesAndYield method only implements IEnumerable<MyModels.Interfaces.ILookup>, so you could cast the result to an IEnumerable<object> (for instance), but not to an IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup>.

Fortunately, the solution is pretty simple. Redefine your AcceptChangesAndYield method as follows:

// Note: We are using a generic type constraint on T.
public static IEnumerable<T> AcceptChangesAndYield<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj)
    where T : MyModels.Interfaces.ILookup
{
    if (obj.IsNull()) yield break;
    foreach (var m in obj)
    {
        // Did you mean to put m.AcceptChanges() here?
        yield return m;
    }
}

This will in turn allow your GetAll method to be implemented as follows:

public IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup> GetAll()
{
    var results = Database.Current.pStatusLookupLoadAll()
        .ExecuteTypedList<MyModels.StatusLookup>();
    // Note: no need for a cast, as the return value is now
    // already strongly typed as IEnumerable<MyModels.StatusLookup>.
    return results.AcceptChangesAndYield();
}

Original Answer: It seems like you just want this?

IEnumerable<T> EnumerateResults<T>(IEnumerable<T> results)
{
    if (results.IsNull()) yield break;
    foreach (T result in results)
    {
        // ..Common logic lines...
        yield return result;
    }
}

Then in your code where you want to remove duplication, you'd just have:

// Specific stuff
var results = BlahBlahBlah();

// Common stuff
return EnumerateResults(results);

Right? Or am I misunderstanding your problem?

share|improve this answer
    
you are spot on what I am trying to do. I'll post an "answer" with what I am getting when I try that. –  David W Apr 6 '11 at 16:55
    
original post edited with what I tried and my current problem. Thx –  David W Apr 6 '11 at 17:06
    
@David W: After looking at your update to the question I'm pretty sure I understand the problem you're running into. Try out the suggestion I've made in my update and let me know if that helps! –  Dan Tao Apr 7 '11 at 1:20

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