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I have four tables, namely

countries,states,cities,areas

which will be the best feasible solution for my database table

Method A :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `countries` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `states` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`country_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `cities` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`state_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `areas` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`zipcode` int(11) NOT NULL,
`city_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

or Method B :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `countries` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `states` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`country_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `cities` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`state_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
`country_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `areas` (
`id` int(11) auto_increment NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`zipcode` int(11) NOT NULL,
`city_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
`state_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
`country_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
UNIQUE(`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

Thank you..

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2  
Listing their names doesn't tell us what you want their relationships to be. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 5 '11 at 19:32
1  
In the future - don't just post SQL dumps for your questions - explain what the difference between your two methods is. –  Jamie Wong Apr 5 '11 at 19:33
    
@Jamie i thought anyone could make out what the tables and relationships meant to be? is it that hard to understand seeing the database table, _id is meant to be foreign key, and about Posting the MySQL dumps i just wanted to make sure i was designing the right approach and if i was wrong someone seeing could suggest me on improving my design. :) –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 19:38
    
no, but remember that you're asking other people to help you for free. The easier you make it for people to help you, the more likely they are to help you. –  Jamie Wong Apr 5 '11 at 19:40
    
i understand your concern Jamie and agree on your thoughts, generally i am more specific towards my question, thanks for your suggestion next time i will correct it :) –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 19:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first is less likely to have problems with synchronization.

The second will offer better performance through denormalization.

Possible related thread: What is a good way to denormalize a mysql database?

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The second version will lead to major headaches if mismatched data is entered. Take the following sample data:

countries: Canada, USA
states: Saskatchewan, Michigan
cities: Saskatoon, Detroit
zipcode: 90210 (california)

insert into  area (...) ('Canada', 'Michigan', 'Saskatoon', 90210)

all individually valid, but the entire record is utterly wrong. Yet, by your design, it's supposed to be valid.

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don't you think Method B can optimize the performance of database as i can reduce my database trip and i can get all foreign key in one single table. that's why i thought before designing the table –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 19:46
    
That's premature optimization. You start out with at least 3rd normal form and then denormalize only if performance becomes an issue. Remember, databases are DESIGNED to relate data amongst tables, that's why they're call relational databases. –  Marc B Apr 5 '11 at 19:51
    
@Marc B, you have a valid point i cannot refuse to, i have already opted Method B and have written lots of codes to work with Method B, i guess it is better i correct and adopt Method B before it runs into any problem for me. –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 19:54
    
you mean correct and adopt method A? –  Marc B Apr 5 '11 at 20:03
    
yes, isn't it a good idea? –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 20:15

It probably depends on what queries you are going to run on those tables. In general, A is normalized whereas B is not (A will use less space).

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Normalisation isn't about "using less space". B is normalised, too. It merely represents different constraints and relationships than does A. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 5 '11 at 19:34
    
Er, scratch that. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 5 '11 at 19:34

I would start with Method A, but if it turns out performance requires the additional columns further down the chain, I'd add them only as needed.

Just be sure to make your _id columns indexes.

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I prefer Method A at first glance, but without knowing specifics about what you want the relationships and constraints to be, it's impossible to say categorically that one is "better" than the other. Follow your application's functional requirements.

Congratulations on looking towards a normalised approach: it's nice to see!

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thank you, but would you generalize on what do you mean by normalization, are you talking about the approach i have adopted? –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Apr 5 '11 at 20:05
    
@Ibrahim: Yes I am. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 5 '11 at 20:05

I personally would choose the first one [Method A]. If you know, for example, the city ID of an area, then you automatically know the state ID and the country ID. While the second one may be a bit more convenient, you may run into issues down the line if say, a city moved to a different state.

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It's always best to start with the normalized form. I would only suggest Method B if you had your RDBMS automatically managing cached column updates. For example, if you mistakenly placed Los Angeles in Michigan, you would need to update multiple locations (unless you had triggers that would update cascading pieces of information in denormalized tables). But without triggers, Method A is without a doubt the best form.

This is assuming of course that your constraints match the ones implicitly dictated by common interpretation when viewing Method A's definition.

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