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Does anyone have suggestions on the most efficient way to implement "update row if it exists else insert" logic using Entity Framework?

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2  
This is something that should be done at the database engine level, in a stored procedure. Otherwise, you'll have to wrap the detect/update/insert in a transaction. – Stephen Chung Apr 6 '11 at 9:12
1  
@Stephen: This, in fact, is what I ended up doing. Thanks. – Jonathan Wood Apr 6 '11 at 14:18
    
Jonathan, your question is very useful to me. Why did you switch to a stored procedure? – Anar Khalilov Jan 15 '14 at 9:54
1  
@Anar: It was just easier and I expect much more efficient. – Jonathan Wood Jan 15 '14 at 16:58
up vote 83 down vote accepted

If you are working with attached object (object loaded from the same instance of the context) you can simply use:

if (context.ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntry(myEntity).State == EntityState.Detached)
{
    context.MyEntities.AddObject(myEntity);
}

// Attached object tracks modifications automatically

context.SaveChanges();

If you can use any knowledge about the object's key you can use something like this:

if (myEntity.Id != 0)
{
    context.MyEntities.Attach(myEntity);
    context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(myEntity, EntityState.Modified);
}
else
{
    context.MyEntities.AddObject(myEntity);
}

context.SaveChanges();

If you can't decide existance of the object by its Id you must exectue lookup query:

var id = myEntity.Id;
if (context.MyEntities.Any(e => e.Id == id))
{
    context.MyEntities.Attach(myEntity);
    context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(myEntity, EntityState.Modified);
}
else
{
    context.MyEntities.AddObject(myEntity);
}

context.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Looks like what I need. Can I ask you one question that's been bothering me for a while? Normally, I put my context in a short using block. Is it okay to leave the context in memory for a while? For example, during the life of a Windows form? I normally try and clean up database objects to ensure minimum load on the database. Is there no problem waiting to destroy my EF context? – Jonathan Wood Apr 6 '11 at 2:16
    
Check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/3653009/… object context should live as short as possible but in case of winforms or wpf this can mean that context is living as long as presenter. The linked question contains link to msdn article about using nhibernate session in winforms. The same approach can be used for context. – Ladislav Mrnka Apr 6 '11 at 5:34
    
But what if i need to do this with a list of objects... in my database there is a list of rows with the same id and i want to replace if thew exist or insert if they dont.. how i do it? thanks! – Phoenix_uy Oct 14 '11 at 11:45
1  
This answer LOOKS awesome, but I'm running into this issue on update: An object with the same key already exists in the ObjectStateManager. The ObjectStateManager cannot track multiple objects with the same key. – John Zumbrum Nov 29 '12 at 21:58
1  
Looks like I was just having a bit of an issue with fetching the existing object so as to retrieve its key before doing the update; detaching that lookup object first helped fix it. – John Zumbrum Nov 29 '12 at 22:15

As of Entity Framework 4.3, there is an AddOrUpdate method at namespace System.Data.Entity.Migrations:

public static void AddOrUpdate<TEntity>(
    this IDbSet<TEntity> set,
    params TEntity[] entities
)
where TEntity : class

which by the doc:

Adds or updates entities by key when SaveChanges is called. Equivalent to an "upsert" operation from database terminology. This method can be useful when seeding data using Migrations.


To answer the comment by @Smashing1978, I will paste relevant parts from link provided by @Colin

The job of AddOrUpdate is to ensure that you don’t create duplicates when you seed data during development.

First, it will execute a query in your database looking for a record where whatever you supplied as a key (first parameter) matches the mapped column value (or values) supplied in the AddOrUpdate. So this is a little loosey-goosey for matching but perfectly fine for seeding design time data.

More importantly, if a match is found then the update will update all and null out any that weren’t in your AddOrUpdate.

That said, I have a situation where I am pulling data from an external service and inserting or updating existing values by primary key (and my local data for consumers is read-only) - been using AddOrUpdate in production for more than 6 months now and so far no problems.

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4  
The System.Data.Entity.Migrations namespace contains classes related to code-based migrations and their configurations. Is there any reason why we shouldn't be using this in our repositories for non-migration entity AddOrUpdates? – Smashing1978 Feb 24 '15 at 20:58
2  
Take care with the AddOrUpdate method: thedatafarm.com/data-access/… – Colin May 14 '15 at 8:43

If you know that you're using the same context and not detaching any entities, you can make a generic version like this:

public void InsertOrUpdate<T>(T entity, DbContext db) where T : class
{
    if (db.Entry(entity).State == EntityState.Detached)
        db.Set<T>().Add(entity);

    // If an immediate save is needed, can be slow though
    // if iterating through many entities:
    db.SaveChanges(); 
}

db can of course be a class field, or the method can be made static and an extension, but this is the basics.

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