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I'm working with serialization in C# right now and I've run into a problem that I can't seem to find an answer to. So I have a serializable class with a list of another serializable class as a property. I needed one of the items in the list to have a distinct property in it so I made a subclass and added it to the list as before. That's when the serialization issues popped up so I can only imagine that lists can't be serialized with inherited classes in them, but why? And how would a similar end be met? Anyways, here's an example of what I'm trying to accomplish:

[Serializable]
public class aList
{
    [XmlElement]public List<b> list = new List<b>();

    public aList()
    {
        list.Add(new b());
        list.Add(new b());
        list.Add(new c());
    }
}

[Serializable]
public class b
{
    [XmlElement]public int prop1;
    [XmlElement]public string prop2;

    public b()
    {
        prop1 = 0;
        prop2 = String.Empty;
    }
}

[Serializable]
public class c : b
{
    [XmlElement]public bool prop3;

    public c() : base()
    {
        prop3 = false;
    }
}
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1  
Note that Serializable has nothing to do with XML serialization. It's for binary serialization only. –  Ondrej Tucny Apr 5 '11 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

XmlInclude attributes. They're kind of...janky. Basically, you give attributes to your classes that give hints to the serializer about your inheritance.

Specifically:

[Serializable]
[XmlInclude(typeof(c))]
public class b
{
    [XmlElement]
    public int prop1;

    [XmlElement]
    public string prop2;

    public b()
    {
        prop1 = 0;
        prop2 = String.Empty;
    }
}
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According to the docs, this attribute is used in relation with data contracts, which are not used here. Correct? –  Serge - appTranslator Apr 5 '11 at 21:24
2  
Edited your answer. KnownType is for DataContractSerializer, not for XmlSerializer. Use XmlInclude instead. –  Ondrej Tucny Apr 5 '11 at 21:27
    
Oh yeah, been working with DataContracts so much, I forgot about the other ones :). Thanks for the correction! –  Nicolas Webb Apr 5 '11 at 21:29
    
Nice! The XmlInclude attribute was the way to go. Fixed all my problems except me forgetting the parameterless constructor on the last type, haha. Thanks to all who contributed! –  Chris Apr 5 '11 at 21:56
    
THANKS so much for this solution... I spent countless of hours trying to rework my whole architecture before I saw this. –  dcasadevall Mar 2 '13 at 1:42

May be try using an array instead of a list. An array is serializable if the element it's holding is serializable.

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