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I have a class which expects a stream that contains an XML file.
I don't necessarily want a file stream and I might want to use other sources like a database, a socket etc.
What class do I need to subclass from the io module in order to supply the stream interface from other sources?

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A socket already has the same interface as another file. A database connection usually provides a "blob" which can be turned into a file-line object using StringIO. Why are you subclassing something when your "stream" interface (i.e., Python's file) already exists? What's unique or different? –  S.Lott Apr 5 '11 at 21:18
    
Why deriving? Python is not C++. Are you sure that just passing something that has a proper read() method isn't enough? –  6502 Apr 5 '11 at 21:34
    
@6502: The XML file can be loaded from a database into a stream. I'm just encapsulating behavior. –  the_drow Apr 6 '11 at 7:04
    
@S.Lott: I want an object that already turns the blob into a file-like object. This kind of object should have the same interface as the file object in order for it to work with my class which expects a stream. –  the_drow Apr 6 '11 at 7:07
    
@the_drow. That object is StringIO.StringIO( blob ). What more do you need? –  S.Lott Apr 6 '11 at 10:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Dynamic typing allows you not to subclass from any base class in this case. You should implement some methods with proper names. Blog post on the subject

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What I don't get is why I shouldn't sub class. In any case my interface should be the stream's interface. –  the_drow Apr 6 '11 at 7:57
    
I wrote only that you are able not to subclass using inheritance mechanism and may create your class and implement methods with needed signature is necessary and sufficient –  Andrey Apr 6 '11 at 15:41

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