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Recently, I found that an array can be initialize as follows:

private static int[] _array = new int[4];

// An arbitrary amount of code

{ 
    _array[0] = 10;
    _array[1] = 20;
    _array[2] = 30;
    _array[3] = 40;
}

What is this form of initialization called? What are its limitations?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is instance member initialization using an initializer block, and it looks a lot like static initialization which would prefix that block with the word static.

Its limitations would match that of any constructor as the Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

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It's also worth noting that this seems like a very dangerous way to initialize an array referenced by a static variable. Each time a new instance is created, the array's previous contents are lost and it is reinitialized to a new set of values. If that's desirable, then _array should probably be an instance member. –  Mark Peters Apr 5 '11 at 21:23
    
@Mark Pardon my curiosity, but is the difference between "member initialization" and "static initialization" only that the member initialization is called each in each constructor for a new instance, whereas static initialization is called only ever once? –  T.K. Apr 5 '11 at 21:31
    
@T.K.:Semantically, a static initializer is run once each time the class is loaded by the class loader. In most cases, this means just once. –  Mark Peters Apr 5 '11 at 21:32
    
@T.K.: member initialization is per instance while static initialization is per class; so member initialization is called every time a new instance is created, while static initialization will be called only the very first time the class is referenced. –  Mark Elliot Apr 5 '11 at 21:33
    
That makes good sense. Thanks. –  T.K. Apr 5 '11 at 22:52
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It is initialization block and regarding to documentation:

The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors

I've answered yesterday in similar post here

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