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I am using the following R code to produce a confusion matrix comparing the true labels of some data to the output of a neural network.

t <- table(as.factor(test.labels), as.factor(nnetpredict))

However, sometimes the neural network doesn't predict any of a certain class, so the table isn't square (as, for example, there are 5 levels in the test.labels factor, but only 3 levels in the nnetpredict factor). I want to make the table square by adding in any factor levels necessary, and setting their counts to zero.

How should I go about doing this?

Example:

> table(as.factor(a), as.factor(b))

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0  0
  2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1  0
  3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0  1
  4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0  0
  5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0  0
  6 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0  0
  7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0  0

You can see in the table above that there are 7 rows, but 10 columns, because the a factor only has 7 levels, whereas the b factor has 10 levels. What I want to do is to pad the table with zeros so that the row labels and the column labels are the same, and the matrix is square. From the example above, this would produce:

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  1  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0  0
  2  0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1  0
  3  0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0  1
  4  0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0  0
  5  0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0  0
  6  0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0  0
  7  0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0  0
  8  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0
  9  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0
  10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0

The reason I need to do this is two-fold:

  • For display to users/in reports
  • So that I can use a function to calculate the Kappa statistic, which requires a table formatted like this (square, same row and col labels)
share|improve this question
    
Don't name objects t to preserve the functionality of the transpose (t()) function. –  Chase Apr 5 '11 at 21:53
    
Thanks - hadn't realised that! –  robintw Apr 5 '11 at 22:22
    
gotcha - I see what you need to do now, it is a bit more complicated than I had originally thought. I'll think about this a bit later. DO you always have factors with overlapping levels? Will the factors always be ordered identically? –  Chase Apr 5 '11 at 23:25
    
Thanks - that's great. In this situation I will have one factor which will always have the digits 0-9 in it, and the other factor will always be some subset of that (most of the time it'll be the full 0-9 as well, but it's when it isn't that I need to sort it out). They should always be ordered in ascending order, at least that's how the table command seems to do it. –  robintw Apr 5 '11 at 23:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT - round II to address the additional details in the question. I deleted my first answer since it wasn't relevant anymore.

This has produced the desired output for the test cases I've given it, but I definitely advise testing thoroughly with your real data. The approach here is to find the full list of levels for both inputs into the table and set that full list as the levels before generating the table.

squareTable <- function(x,y) {
    x <- factor(x)
    y <- factor(y)

    commonLevels <- sort(unique(c(levels(x), levels(y))))

    x <- factor(x, levels = commonLevels)
    y <- factor(y, levels = commonLevels)

    table(x,y)

}

Two test cases:

> #Test case 1
> set.seed(1)
> x <- factor(sample(0:9, 100, TRUE))
> y <- factor(sample(3:7, 100, TRUE))
> 
> table(x,y)
   y
x   3 4 5 6 7
  0 2 1 3 1 0
  1 1 0 2 3 0
  2 1 0 3 4 3
  3 0 3 6 3 2
  4 4 4 3 2 1
  5 2 2 0 1 0
  6 1 2 3 2 3
  7 3 3 3 4 2
  8 0 4 1 2 4
  9 2 1 0 0 3
> squareTable(x,y)
   y
x   0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  0 0 0 0 2 1 3 1 0 0 0
  1 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 0 0 0
  2 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 3 0 0
  3 0 0 0 0 3 6 3 2 0 0
  4 0 0 0 4 4 3 2 1 0 0
  5 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0
  6 0 0 0 1 2 3 2 3 0 0
  7 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 2 0 0
  8 0 0 0 0 4 1 2 4 0 0
  9 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 0 0
> squareTable(y,x)
   y
x   0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  3 2 1 1 0 4 2 1 3 0 2
  4 1 0 0 3 4 2 2 3 4 1
  5 3 2 3 6 3 0 3 3 1 0
  6 1 3 4 3 2 1 2 4 2 0
  7 0 0 3 2 1 0 3 2 4 3
  8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
> 
> #Test case 2
> set.seed(1)
> xx <- factor(sample(0:2, 100, TRUE))
> yy <- factor(sample(3:5, 100, TRUE))
> 
> table(xx,yy)
   yy
xx   3  4  5
  0  4 14  9
  1 14 15  9
  2 11 11 13
> squareTable(xx,yy)
   y
x    0  1  2  3  4  5
  0  0  0  0  4 14  9
  1  0  0  0 14 15  9
  2  0  0  0 11 11 13
  3  0  0  0  0  0  0
  4  0  0  0  0  0  0
  5  0  0  0  0  0  0
> squareTable(yy,xx)
   y
x    0  1  2  3  4  5
  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
  1  0  0  0  0  0  0
  2  0  0  0  0  0  0
  3  4 14 11  0  0  0
  4 14 15 11  0  0  0
  5  9  9 13  0  0  0
share|improve this answer
    
@robintw - updated answer, think we should be on the right track now. Let me know! -C –  Chase Apr 6 '11 at 1:54
    
Thanks - that looks like just what I wanted. Only problem is that sometimes I get an error saying Error in t < squareTable(test.labels, nnetpredict) : non-conformable arrays. I'm not sure why this is happening - I can't see anything different in the data when that occurs! Any ideas? –  robintw Apr 6 '11 at 9:46
1  
@robintw - that is strange - that error typically means you are trying perform multiplication or matrices that can't be multiplied, etc...which isn't terribly intuitive here. It sounds like it works as advertised at least some of the time? I would start by inspecting the str() for a test case that does work and for one that doesn't work and try to identify differences. If possible dput() the contents of a working and non-working example into the question. –  Chase Apr 6 '11 at 11:40
    
Thanks. I've managed to find a working and non-working example, I've put them in a gist: gist.github.com/905603, as they're a bit too long for the question here. –  robintw Apr 6 '11 at 13:07
    
@robintw - hmm, both examples run on my machine with no trouble. I think the as.factor() bit may be redundant since the function converts everything to a factor - but the code executed fine on my machine either way. Are you using this as part of a larger function? Could the error be coming from somewhere else? I wonder if there is a scoping issue going on. Maybe close R and restart a fresh session? Just thinking out loud here... –  Chase Apr 6 '11 at 13:31

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