Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The syntax for a pure function is something like (1+#1+#2)&[a,b], which gives 1+a+b. Now I want to supply the output from some function which looks like {a,b} to the function above, i.e., something like (1+#1+#2)&{a,b}, but with the correct syntax, as that obviously doesn't work. How do I go about doing this?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of how can i pass parameters stored in a list to expression –  Mr.Wizard Sep 9 '13 at 8:16
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The easiest approach is to use Apply (@@):

In[4]:= (1 + #1 + #2) & @@ {a, b}

Out[4]= 1 + a + b
share|improve this answer
3  
An alternative is (1 + ##) & @@ {a, b} that work with any length of the list. –  Alexey Popkov Apr 6 '11 at 6:29
add comment

To provide some alternatives, you can also include the Apply within the function if that is more convenient:

f = (1 + # + #2) & @@ # &;

f @ {a, b}
1 + a + b

Optionally, you can index parts manually:

f = (1 + #[[1]] + #[[2]]) &;

Finally, you may already know this, but for others reading this question:

g[{x_, y_}] := 1 + x + y

g @ {a, b}
1 + a + b
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It's always a pleasure to examine your solutions. –  David Carraher Apr 6 '11 at 1:38
    
@David, thank you very much! –  Mr.Wizard Apr 6 '11 at 1:50
add comment

Here's a version that is an ordinary function (ie can use square brackets) that will take an arbitrary list. The Apply has been moved inside the function and the ## means SlotSequence (c.f. _ and __ in pattern matching)

In[1]:= (1 + ##&@@ #) &[{a, b}]
        (1 + ##&@@ #) &[{a, b, c, d, e}]

Out[1]= 1 + a + b

Out[2]= 1 + a + b + c + d + e
share|improve this answer
1  
Its interesting to note that a pure function will accept an infinite number of arguments, and the number of vars in Function or the max n in #n gives the minimum number of arguments required. However, ##n does not impose any such minimum. –  rcollyer Apr 5 '11 at 23:52
    
@rcollyer are you sure? Try: {##4} & @@@ Array[Range, 5] –  Mr.Wizard Apr 6 '11 at 6:31
    
@Mr, odd. because I'd run some experiments last week with it which seemed to indicate that it worked. back to the drawing board. –  rcollyer Apr 6 '11 at 13:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.