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How should this, /(?>[^<>]+)/, be interpreted please? (PHP RegExp Engine)

Thank you.

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I don't think this is a valid regex. – Czechnology Apr 5 '11 at 22:54
3  
The ? IS valid there. It's an atomic group. – Alex Apr 5 '11 at 22:56
    
+1 Interesting, never heard that. My regex tester threw an error. – Czechnology Apr 5 '11 at 23:00
    
What I don't get is what use does it have in a regex like /(?>[^<>]+)/?? – Czechnology Apr 5 '11 at 23:11
2  
(?>[^<>]+) is exactly the same as [^<>]++. – tchrist Apr 5 '11 at 23:12
up vote 4 down vote accepted
(?>        # I had to look this up, but apparently this syntax prevents the regex
           # parser from backtracking into whatever is matched in this group if 
           # the rest of the  pattern fails
   [^<>]+  # match ANY character except '<' or '>', 1 or more times. 
         ) # close non-backtrackable group.

For anyone interested in the once-only pattern, check out the section Once-only subpatterns in http://www.regextester.com/pregsyntax.html

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If you’re using Perl regular expressions, you should always consult the appropriate documentation.. – tchrist Apr 5 '11 at 23:04
1  
@tchrist He's asking about PHP though – climbage Apr 5 '11 at 23:06
1  
And where do you think the preg_ functions get their name? – tchrist Apr 5 '11 at 23:06
1  
He's talking about PCRE, so the most accurate documentation would be at pcre.org/pcre.txt – Josh Davis Apr 5 '11 at 23:14
    
Ok fair enough, but what about the differences in the PHP implementation mentioned in the site I used? – climbage Apr 5 '11 at 23:16

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