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I'm looking at only latest gen browsers:

  • IE9 (haven't really looked into this once much)
  • FF4
  • Chrome10
  • Safari5
  • iOS 3.4
  • Opera?

I know I can get squares and rectangles easy, circles and ellipsis with rounded borders (circles: W=H, ellipsis: W!=H). I know I can get slopes with border settings. I know how to get 1/2 and 1/4 circles, but is it possible to get:

  • Pie wedge (any size, at any location in the circle? ie. a 18% wedge, 20% off the horizontal)
  • Trapezoids, octagon, pentagon, hexagon
  • Stars (n pointed stars)
  • Any of the individual shapes in this that aren't already mentioned

I'm looking for CSS + DIV options, not <canvas> options. I'm also looking for options that use the least amount of nested divs. Here is an example that shows several shapes in one example...

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Why, oh why are you trying to do this with straight HTML/CSS? It's really not meant for it. Use Canvas, SVG, ANYTHING else. –  zyklus Apr 6 '11 at 3:25
    
@cwolves - I dont want to use the <canvas> because things like $('#buttonTop').click() wont work for just parts of the drawm image in a canvas, whereas I can targets individual parts of an object when using DIVs. SVGs may be targetable for subsections of the overall object but I'm not really looking to draw images as much as build out interface items. –  Justin808 Apr 7 '11 at 1:30
    
yeah, but you're building a star-trek control panel... some of those shapes are going to be a real PITA with HTML/CSS, they'd be simple in any other way. Even just creating an image and image-mapping the entire thing would be more logical! :) –  zyklus Apr 7 '11 at 1:39
    
If you use a canvas for each widget you could easily bind a click event (and you can check whether the mouse is over the drawn widget or a blank pixel using getImageData). Oh, and canvas is supported everywhere (even mobile and even IE6 through excanvas) and its support is quite consistent across implementations. I can't say the same for HTML/CSS (vendor-specific hacks are needed and several properties aren't supported by IE) or SVG (no mobiles unfortunately). –  framp May 24 '12 at 14:49
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1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Check out this page for some examples: http://css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS/. The examples use only a single HTML element, so more would be possible with added complexity.

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+1 Nice resource. –  loyalpenguin Apr 6 '11 at 2:43
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