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Does %*d mean one or more integer? in sprintf function

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If you assume it is regex then you have two problems. –  Hans Passant Apr 6 '11 at 4:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is used to manipulate the minimum width of the numerical value printed, and it specifically means that the width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted. In other words, if you wanted to use a width that was stored in a variable, you could do this:

int width = /* something */;
printf("%*d", width, value);

EDIT: Oops! Correct syntax for sprintf is:

sprintf(buffer, "%*d", width, value);
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Just one remark: That’s the correct syntax for printf() but not for sprintf(). –  Bavarious Apr 6 '11 at 3:20
    
@Bavarious: Criminy! Thanks for the catch. –  Jollymorphic Apr 6 '11 at 3:23

In the case of sprintf, it means you'll pass two integers, one specifies the field width, and the other the value you're going to convert.

IOW:

sprintf(buffer, "%5d", value);

is essentially the same as:

sprintf(buffer, "%*d", 5, value);

Much like when you're passing values as widths as literals in the format string, you can specify both a width and a precision if you want, something like this:

sprintf(buffer, "%*.*d", 5, 2, value);

It's also worth noting that with scanf and company, a "*" in the format string has a completely different meaning (to convert some input, but not assign the result to anything).

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+1 thorough treatment including the surprising difference in scanf. –  R.. Apr 6 '11 at 4:13

It is similar to %2d, which is "print a 2 length integer", except the length is specified as a parameter (not sure the order). Reference

The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.

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The * refers to a the width or spacing of the integer in this case. The * is a place holder that lets you specify the width as an argument preceding the argument to be formatted (the integer in this case)

printf("The integer will be printed 10 spaces to the right: %*d", 10, 50);
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