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To make a JavaScript class with a public method I'd do something like:

function Restaurant()
{
}

Restaurant.prototype.buy_food = function()
{
   // something here
}

Restaurant.prototype.use_restroom = function()
{
   // something here
}

That way users of my class can:

var restaurant = new Restaurant();
restaurant.buy_food();
restaurant.use_restroom();

How do I create a private method that my public buy_food and use_restroom methods can call but that users of the class can't call externally.

In other words, I want my method implementation to be able to do:

Restaurant.prototype.use_restroom = function()
{
   this.private_stuff();
}

But this shouldn't work:

var r = new Restaurant();
r.private_stuff();

How do I define private_stuff as a private method so both of those hold true?

I've read Doug Crockford's writeup a few times but it doesn't seem like "private" methods can be called by public methods and "privileged" methods can be called externally.

share|improve this question

21 Answers 21

up vote 181 down vote accepted

You can do it, but the downside is that it can't be part of the prototype:

function Restaurant()
{
    var myPrivateVar;

    var private_stuff = function()   // Only visible inside Restaurant()
    {
        myPrivateVar = "I can set this here!";
    }

    this.use_restroom = function()   // use_restroom is visible to all
    {
        private_stuff();
    }

    this.buy_food = function()    // buy_food is visible to all
    {
        private_stuff();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Hiding thins inside the closure will not guarantee privacy on all interpreters. See code.google.com/p/google-caja/wiki/… –  Mike Samuel Sep 29 '08 at 17:37
18  
@mikesamuel - true, but only when those interpreters have bugs in them :) –  jvenema May 15 '10 at 15:26
45  
This is a private method all right, but will tend to use up a lot more memory than an usual prototype method, especially if you are creating a lot of these objects. For every object instance, it creates a separate function bound to the object and not the class. Also, this does not get garbage collected until the object itself is destroyed. –  Arindam Feb 6 '12 at 22:37
3  
If you make an object McDonalds() inherit from Restaurant() McDonalds can't override private methods if you declare them in this way. Well, actually you can, but it will not work if some other method calls the private, it will call the original version of the method and you also can't call the parent method. So far I have not found a good way to declare private methods that work well with inheritance. This and the performance implications makes this not a very good design pattern at all. I would recommend doing some kind of prefix to indicate private methods, likestarting with an underline. –  Hoffmann Jun 25 '13 at 17:56
19  
Private methods aren't supposed to get overridden - they're private. –  17 of 26 Jun 25 '13 at 18:55

You can simulate private methods like this:

function Restaurant() {
}

Restaurant.prototype = (function() {
    var private_stuff = function() {
        // Private code here
    };

    return {

        constructor:Restaurant,

        use_restroom:function() {
            private_stuff();
        }

    };
})();

var r = new Restaurant();

// This will work:
r.use_restroom();

// This will cause an error:
r.private_stuff();

More information on this technique here: http://webreflection.blogspot.com/2008/04/natural-javascript-private-methods.html

share|improve this answer
5  
I would also suggest Douglas Crockford's site as a resource on private / public methods and members javascript.crockford.com/private.html –  Jared Sep 11 '08 at 1:30
2  
He mentioned that link in the question. –  Gulzar Nazim Sep 11 '08 at 1:31
7  
The downside to this method is that you couldn't have private_stuff() access other private data in Restaurant and other Restaurant methods can't call private_stuff(). The upside is that if you don't need either of the conditions I just mentioned, you can keep use_restroom() in the prototype. –  17 of 26 Sep 11 '08 at 1:33
3  
This should be the solution and accepted answer because the author is clearly using the prototype property. –  Gabriel Llamas Jan 31 '12 at 10:00
11  
With the pattern proposed by @georgebrock, all private data will be shared among all restaurant objects. That is akin to static private variables and functions in class based OOP. I assume that the OP does not want this. To illustrate what I mean, I created a jsFiddle. –  feklee Jul 30 '12 at 9:39

In these situations when you have a public API, and you would like private and public methods/properties, I always use the Module Pattern. This pattern was made popular within the YUI library, and the details can be found here:

http://yuiblog.com/blog/2007/06/12/module-pattern/

It is really straightforward, and easy for other developers to comprehend. For a simple example:

var MYLIB = function() {  
    var aPrivateProperty = true;
    var aPrivateMethod = function() {
    	// some code here...
    };
    return {
    	aPublicMethod : function() {
    		aPrivateMethod(); // okay
    		// some code here...
    	},
    	aPublicProperty : true
    };  
}();

MYLIB.aPrivateMethod() // not okay
MYLIB.aPublicMethod() // okay
share|improve this answer
    
this kind of thing wouldn't be detected by the autocomplete of an IDE :( –  Click Upvote Jun 9 '11 at 2:33
10  
But this is not a class, so you can't have 2 "instances" of this with different states. –  DevAntoine Aug 21 '12 at 15:26
    
remove the () part and you have a "class". at least where you can instantiate different isntances with different states. the module pattern is quite memory intensive, though ... –  oligofren Feb 17 at 15:56
    
@DevAntoine Look at the comments for 17 of 26's answer. In JavaScript extensible classes and private methods don't easily go hand in hand. My suggestion in this case would be to go with composition over inheritance. Create an extensible prototype with the same methods as the enclosed concrete object. Then internal to your prototype you can decide when to call methods on your concrete object. –  Brian Reindel Feb 17 at 17:21

Here is the class which I created to understand what Douglas Crockford's has suggested in his site Private Members in JavaScript

function Employee(id, name) { //Constructor
    //Public member variables
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    //Private member variables
    var fName;
    var lName;
    var that = this;
    //By convention, we create a private variable 'that'. This is used to     
    //make the object available to the private methods. 

    //Private function
    function setFName(pfname) {
        fName = pfname;
        alert('setFName called');
    }
    //Privileged function
    this.setLName = function (plName, pfname) {
        lName = plName;  //Has access to private variables
        setFName(pfname); //Has access to private function
        alert('setLName called ' + this.id); //Has access to member variables
    }
    //Another privileged member has access to both member variables and private variables
    //Note access of this.dataOfBirth created by public member setDateOfBirth
    this.toString = function () {
        return 'toString called ' + this.id + ' ' + this.name + ' ' + fName + ' ' + lName + ' ' + this.dataOfBirth; 
    }
}
//Public function has access to member variable and can create on too but does not have access to private variable
Employee.prototype.setDateOfBirth = function (dob) {
    alert('setDateOfBirth called ' + this.id);
    this.dataOfBirth = dob;   //Creates new public member note this is accessed by toString
    //alert(fName); //Does not have access to private member
}
$(document).ready()
{
    var employee = new Employee(5, 'Shyam'); //Create a new object and initialize it with constructor
    employee.setLName('Bhaskar', 'Ram');  //Call privileged function
    employee.setDateOfBirth('1/1/2000');  //Call public function
    employee.id = 9;                     //Set up member value
    //employee.setFName('Ram');  //can not call Private Privileged method
    alert(employee.toString());  //See the changed object

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nice hack var that = this; –  Thomas C. G. de Vilhena Aug 18 '12 at 18:51
4  
The that=this is a pattern that is quite common, popularized by aforementioned Crockford in his book "Javascript: The good parts" –  oligofren Oct 2 '12 at 16:30
2  
that is used instead of this to avoid scoping issues, when functions are bound to a different object. Here, you are storing this in that and never using it again which is the same as not doing it at all. You should change this with that all across the Constructor inner functions (not methods declaration). If employee is applyed or called in some way these methods might throw since this will be incorrectly bound. –  Maroshii Jul 25 '13 at 22:57
    
Also, every instance will have a full copy of the private functions, inefficient. That on top of the fact that public methods can't access private class vars, makes me want to switch to dart. Unfortunately angulardart is super beta. –  Ray May 27 at 5:13

I conjured up this: EDIT: Actually, someone has linked to a identical solution. Duh!

var Car = function() {
}

Car.prototype = (function() {
    var hotWire = function() {
    	// Private code *with* access to public properties through 'this'
    	alert( this.drive() ); // Alerts 'Vroom!'
    }

    return {
    	steal: function() {
    		hotWire.call( this ); // Call a private method
    	},
    	drive: function() {
    		return 'Vroom!';
    	}
    };
})();

var getAwayVechile = new Car();

hotWire(); // Not allowed
getAwayVechile.hotWire(); // Not allowed
getAwayVechile.steal(); // Alerts 'Vroom!'
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a nice technique, but how would you allow parameters in your constructor? For example var getAwayVehicle = new Car(100); where 100 is speed and you want to alert speed. Thanks! –  Jason Jun 2 '10 at 16:43
1  
Figured it out, can have var Car = function(speed) { this.speed = speed; } and ` return { constructor: Car, ...` –  Jason Jun 2 '10 at 19:23

I think such questions come up again and again because of the lack of understanding of the closures. Сlosures is most important thing in JS. Every JS programmer have to feel the essence of it.

1. First of all we need to make separate scope (closure).

function () {

}

2. In this area, we can do whatever we want. And no one will know about it.

function () {
    var name,
        secretSkills = {
            pizza: function () { return new Pizza() },
            sushi: function () { return new Sushi() }
        }

    function Restaurant(_name) {
        name = _name
    }
    Restaurant.prototype.getFood = function (name) {
        return name in secretSkills ? secretSkills[name]() : null
    }
}

3. For the world to know about our restaurant class, we have to return it from the closure.

var Restaurant = (function () {
    // Restaurant definition
    return Restaurant
})()

4. At the end, we have:

var Restaurant = (function () {
    var name,
        secretSkills = {
            pizza: function () { return new Pizza() },
            sushi: function () { return new Sushi() }
        }

    function Restaurant(_name) {
        name = _name
    }
    Restaurant.prototype.getFood = function (name) {
        return name in secretSkills ? secretSkills[name]() : null
    }
    return Restaurant
})()

5. Also, this approach has potential for inheritance and templating

// Abstract class
function AbstractRestaurant(skills) {
    var name
    function Restaurant(_name) {
        name = _name
    }
    Restaurant.prototype.getFood = function (name) {
        return skills && name in skills ? skills[name]() : null
    }
    return Restaurant
}

// Concrete classes
SushiRestaurant = AbstractRestaurant({ 
    sushi: function() { return new Sushi() } 
})

PizzaRestaurant = AbstractRestaurant({ 
    pizza: function() { return new Pizza() } 
})

var r1 = new SushiRestaurant('Yo! Sushi'),
    r2 = new PizzaRestaurant('Dominos Pizza')

r1.getFood('sushi')
r2.getFood('pizza')

I hope this helps someone better understand this subject

share|improve this answer
1  
What you have in point 4. is marvellous! I think it's the only answer from all the ones here where you get both the performance/memory gains of using methods on the prototype AND these public methods have full access to the private members. +1 –  Hudon Oct 8 '13 at 17:18
1  
It doesn't work. The name variable here acts like static variable and is shared by all instances of Restaurant. Here's jsbin: jsbin.com/oqewUWa/2/edit?js,output –  ShitalShah Nov 6 '13 at 6:24
    
it's a good try, but as Shital pointed out, the name variable is buggy. –  oligofren Feb 17 at 16:00
    
adding my 2c here to reaffirm this does not work, looks nice, but as pointed out above "name" will serve as a static variable i.e. shared across all instances –  Paul Carroll Sep 18 at 22:47

All of this closure will cost you. Make sure you test the speed implications especially in IE. You will find you are better off with a naming convention. There are still a lot of corporate web users out there that are forced to use IE6...

share|improve this answer
19  
Who cares, seriously? –  nowayyy Apr 18 '11 at 15:19
    
about 9% of the world –  AlexMorley-Finch Sep 28 '11 at 9:40
11  
That 9% that are still using IE6 don't care about speed, optimizations and all modern HTML5 features. So closures won't cost anything. –  Gabriel Llamas Jan 31 '12 at 10:06
3  
It is now 0.5% (August 2012) w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_explorer.asp –  Lorenzo Polidori Oct 5 '12 at 14:24
1  
@LorenzoPolidori w3schools users !== corporate web users ;] –  Wynand Feb 19 at 0:58

Using self invoking function and call

JavaScript uses prototypes and don't have classes (and methods) like many object oriented languages. A JavaScript developer need to think in JavaScript.

Wikipedia quote:

Unlike many object-oriented languages, there is no distinction between a function definition and a method definition. Rather, the distinction occurs during function calling; when a function is called as a method of an object, the function's local this keyword is bound to that object for that invocation.

Solution using a self invoking function and the call function to call the private "method" :

var MyObject = (function () {

    // Constructor
    function MyObject(foo) {
        this._foo = foo;
    }

    MyObject.prototype.publicFun = function() {
        return privateFun.call(this, '>>');
    }

    function privateFun(prefix) {
        return prefix + this._foo;
    }

    return MyObject;

})();


var myObject = new MyObject('bar');
myObject.publicFun(); // Returns '>>bar'
myObject.privateFun('>>'); // ReferenceError: private is not defined

The call function allow us to call the private function with the appropriate context (this).


Simpler with Node.js

If you are using node.js, you don't need the IIFE part because you can take advantage of the module loading system:

function MyObject(foo) {
    this._foo = foo;
}

MyObject.prototype.publicFun = function() {
    return privateFun.call(this, '>>');
}

function privateFun(prefix) {
    return prefix + this._foo;
}

exports.MyObject = MyObject;

Load the file:

var MyObject = require('./MyObject.js');

var myObject = new MyObject('bar');
myObject.publicFun(); // Returns '>>bar'
myObject.privateFun('>>'); // ReferenceError: private is not defined
share|improve this answer

The apotheosis of the Module Pattern: The Revealing Module Pattern

A neat little extension to a very robust pattern.

share|improve this answer

If you want the full range of public and private functions with the ability for public functions to access private functions, layout code for an object like this:

function MyObject(arg1, arg2, ...) {
  //constructor code using constructor arguments...
  //create/access public variables as 
  // this.var1 = foo;

  //private variables

  var v1;
  var v2;

  //private functions
  function privateOne() {
  }

  function privateTwon() {
  }

  //public functions

  MyObject.prototype.publicOne = function () {
  };

  MyObject.prototype.publicTwo = function () {
  };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone tell me why this got voted down? Looks good to me. –  thomasrutter Mar 22 '10 at 1:03
6  
Each time you do a new MyObject, the prototype of MyObject is replaced with the same values. –  bpierre Nov 12 '11 at 2:39
    
-1. Never ever assign to the .prototype inside the constructor. –  Bergi Aug 7 at 2:03

I think the problem with @domgblackwell's and @James's approach is that prototype methods will be defined over and over with every instance created. However since it's an override it may be a non-issue from memory aspect. It loses points on elegance though, cause it's quite ugly to define those methods every time.

share|improve this answer

What about this?

var Restaurant = (function() {

var _id = 0;
var privateVars = [];

function Restaurant(name) {
    this.id = ++_id;
    this.name = name;
    privateVars[this.id] = {
        cooked: []
    };
}

Restaurant.prototype.cook = function (food) {
    privateVars[this.id].cooked.push(food);
}

return Restaurant;

})();

Private variable lookup is impossible outside of the scope of the immediate function. There is no duplication of functions, saving memory.

The downside is that the lookup of private variables is clunky privateVars[this.id].cooked is ridiculous to type. There is also an extra "id" variable.

share|improve this answer
    
This will leave Restaurant as undefined because you're not returning anything from the anonymous function. –  user4815162342 Feb 5 at 10:13
    
-1. This is horribly leaking memory. –  Bergi Aug 7 at 2:02
    
Where and how? Assuming the reference to the created Restaurant is lost, privateVars won't have a reference to its owner. The reference graph is acyclic. What am I missing? –  Evan Leis Aug 12 at 19:50
var TestClass = function( ) {

    var privateProperty = 42;

    function privateMethod( ) {
        alert( "privateMethod, " + privateProperty );
    }

    this.public = {
        constructor: TestClass,

        publicProperty: 88,
        publicMethod: function( ) {
            alert( "publicMethod" );
            privateMethod( );
        }
    };
};
TestClass.prototype = new TestClass( ).public;


var myTestClass = new TestClass( );

alert( myTestClass.publicProperty );
myTestClass.publicMethod( );

alert( myTestClass.privateMethod || "no privateMethod" );

Similar to georgebrock but a little less verbose (IMHO) Any problems with doing it this way? (I haven't seen it anywhere)

edit: I realised this is kinda useless since every independent instantiation has its own copy of the public methods, thus undermining the use of the prototype.

share|improve this answer

Take any of the solutions that follow Crockford's private or priviledged pattern. For example:

function Foo(x) {
    var y = 5;
    var bar = function() {
        return y * x;
    };

    this.public = function(z) {
        return bar() + x * z;
    };
}

In any case where the attacker has no "execute" right on the JS context he has no way of accessing any "public" or "private" fields or methods. In case the attacker does have that access he can execute this one-liner:

eval("Foo = " + Foo.toString().replace(
    /{/, "{ this.eval = function(code) { return eval(code); }; "
));

Note that the above code is generic to all constructor-type-privacy. It will fail with some of the solutions here but it should be clear that pretty much all of the closure based solutions can be broken like this with different replace() parameters.

After this is executed any object created with new Foo() is going to have an eval method which can be called to return or change values or methods defined in the constructor's closure, e.g.:

f = new Foo(99);
f.eval("x");
f.eval("y");
f.eval("x = 8");

The only problem I can see with this that it won't work for cases where there is only one instance and it's created on load. But then there is no reason to actually define a prototype and in that case the attacker can simply recreate the object instead of the constructor as long as he has a way of passing the same parameters (e.g. they are constant or calculated from available values).

In my opinion, this pretty much makes Crockford's solution useless. Since the "privacy" is easily broken the downsides of his solution (reduced readability & maintainability, decreased performance, increased memory) makes the "no privacy" prototype based method the better choice.

I do usually use leading underscores to mark __private and _protected methods and fields (Perl style), but the idea of having privacy in JavaScript just shows how it's a misunderstood language.

Therefore I disagree with Crockford except for his first sentence.

So how do you get real privacy in JS? Put everything that is required to be private on the server side and use JS to do AJAX calls.

share|improve this answer

Private functions cannot access the public variables using module pattern

share|improve this answer

Since everybody was posting here his own code, I'm gonna do that too...

I like Crockford because he introduced real object oriented patterns in Javascript. But he also came up with a new misunderstanding, the "that" one.

So why is he using "that = this"? It has nothing to do with private functions at all. It has to do with inner functions!

Because according to Crockford this is buggy code:

Function Foo( ) {
    this.bar = 0; 
    var foobar=function( ) {
        alert(this.bar);
    }
} 

So he suggested doing this:

Function Foo( ) {
    this.bar = 0;
    that = this; 
    var foobar=function( ) {
        alert(that.bar);
    }
}

So as I said, I'm quite sure that Crockford was wrong his explanation about that and this (but his code is certainly correct). Or was he just fooling the Javascript world, to know who is copying his code? I dunno...I'm no browser geek ;D

EDIT

Ah, that's what is all about: What does var that = this; mean in javascript?

So Crockie was really wrong with his explanation....but right with his code, so he's still a great guy. :))

share|improve this answer

In general I added the private Object _ temporarily to the object. You have to open the privacy exlipcitly in the "Power-constructor" for the method. If you call the method from the prototype, you will be able to overwrite the prototype-method

  • Make a public method accessible in the "Power-constructor": (ctx is the object context)

    ctx.test = GD.Fabric.open('test', GD.Test.prototype, ctx, _); // is a private object
    
  • Now I have this openPrivacy:

    GD.Fabric.openPrivacy = function(func, clss, ctx, _) {
        return function() {
            ctx._ = _;
            var res = clss[func].apply(ctx, arguments);
            ctx._ = null;
            return res;
        };
    };
    
share|improve this answer

This is what I worked out:

Needs one class of sugar code that you can find here. Also supports protected, inheritance, virtual, static stuff...

;( function class_Restaurant( namespace )
{
    'use strict';

    if( namespace[ "Restaurant" ] ) return    // protect against double inclusions

        namespace.Restaurant = Restaurant
    var Static               = TidBits.OoJs.setupClass( namespace, "Restaurant" )


    // constructor
    //
    function Restaurant()
    {
        this.toilets = 3

        this.Private( private_stuff )

        return this.Public( buy_food, use_restroom )
    }

    function private_stuff(){ console.log( "There are", this.toilets, "toilets available") }

    function buy_food     (){ return "food"        }
    function use_restroom (){ this.private_stuff() }

})( window )


var chinese = new Restaurant

console.log( chinese.buy_food()      );  // output: food
console.log( chinese.use_restroom()  );  // output: There are 3 toilets available
console.log( chinese.toilets         );  // output: undefined
console.log( chinese.private_stuff() );  // output: undefined

// and throws: TypeError: Object #<Restaurant> has no method 'private_stuff'
share|improve this answer
Class({  
    Namespace:ABC,  
    Name:"ClassL2",  
    Bases:[ABC.ClassTop],  
    Private:{  
        m_var:2  
    },  
    Protected:{  
        proval:2,  
        fight:Property(function(){  
            this.m_var--;  
            console.log("ClassL2::fight (m_var)" +this.m_var);  
        },[Property.Type.Virtual])  
    },  
    Public:{  
        Fight:function(){  
            console.log("ClassL2::Fight (m_var)"+this.m_var);  
            this.fight();  
        }  
    }  
});  

https://github.com/nooning/JSClass

share|improve this answer

I have created a new tool to allow you to have true private methods on the prototype https://github.com/TremayneChrist/ProtectJS

Example:

var MyObject = (function () {

  // Create the object
  function MyObject() {}

  // Add methods to the prototype
  MyObject.prototype = {

    // This is our public method
    public: function () {
      console.log('PUBLIC method has been called');
    },

    // This is our private method, using (_)
    _private: function () {
      console.log('PRIVATE method has been called');
    }
  }

  return protect(MyObject);

})();

// Create an instance of the object
var mo = new MyObject();

// Call its methods
mo.public(); // Pass
mo._private(); // Fail
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain how it works, please? How/where can you call the _private method? –  Bergi Aug 7 at 2:06

You have to put a closure around your actual constructor-function, where you can define your private methods. To change data of the instances through these private methods, you have to give them "this" with them, either as an function argument or by calling this function with .apply(this) :

var Restaurant = (function(){
    var private_buy_food = function(that){
        that.data.soldFood = true;
    }
    var private_take_a_shit = function(){
        this.data.isdirty = true;   
    }
    // New Closure
    function restaurant()
    {
        this.data = {
            isdirty : false,
            soldFood: false,
        };
    }

    restaurant.prototype.buy_food = function()
    {
       private_buy_food(this);
    }
    restaurant.prototype.use_restroom = function()
    {
       private_take_a_shit.call(this);
    }
    return restaurant;
})()

// TEST:

var McDonalds = new Restaurant();
McDonalds.buy_food();
McDonalds.use_restroom();
console.log(McDonalds);
console.log(McDonalds.__proto__);
share|improve this answer
2  
I don't know if this works, but it made me laugh! –  Component 10 Aug 1 '13 at 14:25
    
of course it works ! –  Flex Elektro Deimling Aug 16 '13 at 19:28
    
Actually, it doesn't work. Every new Restaurant will have its own restaurant contstructor, and the "prototype" is totally abused. –  Bergi Aug 7 at 2:05
    
@Bergi. Actually, you´re right. It would work but would also be a ressource hog (is it called like that?). I edited my answer in regard of that. –  Flex Elektro Deimling Aug 9 at 14:40
    
Thanks for the update. No idea what to call the previous version (but "bug" :-) –  Bergi Aug 9 at 14:43

protected by Bergi Aug 7 at 2:10

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