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This is an interview question Looking for best optimal solution to trim multiple spaces from a string. This operation should be in-place operation.

input  = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot"
output = "I Like StackOverflow a lot"

String functions are not allowed, as this is an interview question. Looking for an algorithmic solution of the problem.

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1  
Do you mean "in place" instead of "in memory"? –  MAK Apr 6 '11 at 3:37
    
@MAK: Yes, thanks for pointing it out. –  Unicorn Apr 6 '11 at 3:50
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10 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Keep two indices: The next available spot to put a letter in (say, i), and the current index you're examining (say, j).

Just loop over all the characters with j, and whenever you see a letter, copy it to index i, then increment i. If you see a space that was not preceded by a space, also copy the space.

I think this would work in-place...

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Make sure the "was not preceded by a space" check isn't just checking if s[j-1] == ' ' because the array's being modified as you go. It's safer to maintain a flag that keeps track of whether the previous character you saw was a space. –  Kannan Goundan Apr 6 '11 at 3:47
    
@Kannan: Yeah I actually did think about writing that, but I let the reader figure it out for himself. ;) –  Mehrdad Apr 6 '11 at 3:51
    
@Kannan: That is not actually required in this case. Just checking s[j-1] == ' ' is sufficient. –  Chris Hopman Apr 11 '11 at 5:48
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Does using <algorithm> qualify as "algorithmic solution"?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
struct BothAre
{
    char c;
    BothAre(char r) : c(r) {}
    bool operator()(char l, char r) const
    {
            return r == c && l == c;
    }
};
int main()
{
    std::string str = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot";
    std::string::iterator i = unique(str.begin(), str.end(), BothAre(' '));
    std::copy(str.begin(), i, std::ostream_iterator<char>(std::cout, ""));
    std::cout << '\n';
}

test run: https://ideone.com/ITqxB

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2  
That's a nifty abuse! –  Matthieu M. Apr 6 '11 at 6:47
3  
@Matthieu: I wouldn't call this abuse - the unique stl algorithm is exactly designed for this type of situation. Requiring a functor class is admittedly awkward, but that's a fairly common limitation of stl algorithms pre-C++0X. –  Eclipse Apr 6 '11 at 16:50
    
@Eclipse: I call it an abuse because it is a bit far-stretched with regard to the functor-less version, which simply uses ==. Here the functor change the semantics, since two items that compare equal are not necessarily merged... I am pretty amazed by the trick though, especially because a simple "semantic" change on the functor helped hijack the algorithm :) –  Matthieu M. Apr 6 '11 at 16:54
1  
@Matthieu M: that's nothing compared to what std::inner_product can do when called with creatively-chosen functors (as explored by APL programmers decades ago) –  Cubbi Apr 6 '11 at 16:56
1  
This is a great use of a C++ standard library algorithm! –  Boris Jun 18 '13 at 6:17
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A c++0x - solution using a lambda instead of a regular function object. Compare to Cubbi's solution.

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::string str = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot";

    str.erase(std::unique(str.begin(), str.end(),
      [](char a, char b) { return a == ' ' && b == ' '; } ), str.end() );  
}
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I'd just go with this:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char *f, *b, arr[] = "  This        is    a test.                ";
    f = b = arr;

    if (f) do
    {
        while(*f == ' ' && *(f+1) == ' ') f++;
    } while (*b++ = *f++);

    printf("%s", arr);

    return 0;
}
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char *f, *b, arr[] = ""; –  BЈовић Apr 6 '11 at 6:42
    
@VJo: Care to explain the comment? The algorithm (while might be inefficient in that it copies all valid elements of the array regardless of whether they have to be moved or not --i.e. even if they stay in the same place-- seems correct. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 6 '11 at 7:56
    
@David Yes, it works correctly, except in the empty string case. Can you guess what is the output when the arr contains an empty string? –  BЈовић Apr 6 '11 at 8:07
2  
@VJo, it prints an empty string. What else would it print? –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Apr 6 '11 at 9:02
    
@edA Ah, right. If the first check fails, the second will not be executed at all. sorry for confusion –  BЈовић Apr 6 '11 at 10:05
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I'd propose a little state machine (just a simple switch statement). Because if the interviewer is anything like me, the first enhancement they'll ask you to do is to fully trim any leading or trailing spaces, so that:

"    leading and    trailing    "

gets transformed to:

"leading and trailing"

instead of:

" leading and trailing "

This is a really simple modification to a state-machine design, and to me it seems easier to understand the state-machine logic in general over a 'straight-forward' coded loop, even if it takes a few more lines of code than a straight-forward loop.

And if you argue that the modifications to the straight forward loop wouldn't be too bad (which can be reasonably argued), then I (as the interviewer) would throw in that I also want leading zeros from numbers to be be trimmed.

On the other hand, a lot of interviewers might actually dislike a state-machine solution as being 'non-optimal'. I guess it depends on what you're trying to optimize.

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It would help people relate to this advise if you implemented both so the implications were made tangible ;-). –  Tony D Apr 6 '11 at 6:22
    
Very nice enhancement. And to be fair it was actually asked :). It would be nice if you can give some algo for that as well... –  Unicorn Apr 6 '11 at 6:35
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Here it is using only stdio:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
    char str[] = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot";
    int i, j = 0, lastSpace = 0;
    for(i = 0;str[i]; i++){
        if(!lastSpace || str[i] != ' '){
            str[j] = str[i];
            j++;
        }
        lastSpace = (str[i] == ' ');
    }
    str[j] = 0;
    puts(str);
    return 0;
}
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Trimming multiple spaces also means a space should always be followed by a non space character.

int pack = 0;
char str[] = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot";
for (int iter = 1; iter < strlen(str); iter++)
{
    if (str[pack] == ' ' && str[iter] == ' ')
        continue;
    str[++pack] = str[iter];
}
str[++pack] = NULL;
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void trimspaces(char * str){
    int i = 0;
    while(str[i]!='\0'){
        if(str[i]==' '){
            for(int j = i + 1; j<strlen(str);j++){
                if(str[j]!=' '){
                    memmove(str + i + 1, str + j, strlen(str)-j+1);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        i++;
    }
}
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Functional variant in Haskell:

import Data.List (intercalate)

trimSpaces :: String -> String
trimSpaces =  intercalate " " . words

The algorithm the next:

  1. breaks a string up into a list of words, which were delimited by white space
  2. concatenate the list inserting one space between each element in list
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int j = 0;
int k=0;
char str[] = "I    Like    StackOverflow a      lot"; 
int length = strlen(str);
char str2[38];
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) 
{ 
    if (str[i] == ' ' && str[i+1] == ' ') 
     continue; 
    str2[j] = str[i];
    j++;
} 

str2[j] =NULL;

cout<<str2;
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this code was tried on VS 2010 –  MNA Mar 27 '12 at 4:57
    
did you test with a string ending in ' ' ? str[i+1] should fail when i points to last char –  Jayan Mar 27 '12 at 9:30
    
The question asked for an in-place version, and this copies to a separate buffer (str2). Also, str2 is statically allocated on the stack, and will overflow for some inputs -- that's not a good idea. And you've declared a variable 'k' which you don't use. –  metamatt Oct 26 '12 at 21:43
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