Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a class that wraps NSURLConnection. It accepts a block that it calls back when it finishes loading. To give you an idea, see below. When you send a request, it saves the callback on the instance. Assume my class is named Request

// from Request.h
@property (nonatomic, copy) void(^callback)(Request*);
- (void) sendWithCallback:(void(^)(Request*))callback;

My code to use one looks something like this:

Request * request = [Request requestWithURL:url];
[request sendWithCallback:^(Request * request) {
    // do some stuff
}]

My question is: what does the block do to the retain count of request? Does it copy/retain it? Notice that I didn't put __block in front of the definition.

I just changed something major in Request (switched from a synchronous NSURLConnection to async ASIHTTPRequest), and it started deallocing almost immediately after sending (causing delegate methods to call a dealloced object). With the sync NSURLConnection, that never happened.

I guess it makes sense that it would get dealloced with async, but how would I retain request appropriately? If I retained it right after I created it, I'd have to release it in the callback, but the callback doesn't get called if the request is cancelled, and would create a memory leak.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what does the block do to the retain count of request? Does it copy/retain it?

No, it doesn't.

Request * request = [Request requestWithURL:url];
[request sendWithCallback:^(Request * request) {
    // The request argument shadows the request local variable,
    // this block doesn't retain the request instance.
}]

If the block doesn't have the request argument,

Request * request = [Request requestWithURL:url];
[request sendWithCallback:^{
    // If you use the request local variable in this block,
    // this block automatically retains the request instance.
}]

In this case, it would cause retain cycles (the request retains the block, the block retains the request).

Please take a look at my AsyncURLConnection class. NSURLConnection retains AsyncURLConnection instance, so you don't own AsyncURLConnection stuff by yourself.

How to use

[AsyncURLConnection request:url completeBlock:^(NSData *data) {
    // Do success stuff
} errorBlock:^(NSError *error) {
    // Do error stuff
}];
share|improve this answer

Blocks won’t automatically retain or copy object arguments. It’s the same semantics as passing object arguments to methods or functions — the block, method, or function should retain its arguments if there’s potential for the current autorelease pool to drain before the block, method, or function has finished using the arguments.

Note the workflow in your scenario. This code:

Request * request = [Request requestWithURL:url];
[request sendWithCallback:^(Request * request) {
    // do some stuff
}];

does not execute the block yet, nor does it pass any argument to the block. It creates a block and passes it as an argument to -sendWithCallback:. The block has a parameter called request of type Request * but the actual argument hasn’t been passed yet.

At some point later in your code, and assuming you’ve stored the block in callback, that block will be called as:

callback(someRequest); // or callback(self);

or

self.callback(someRequest); // or self.callback(self);

or

aRequest.callback(someRequest); // or someRequest.callback(someRequest);

depending on who’s responsible for calling it. At this point, whoever calls the callback should have a reference to a valid request (someRequest), and that request is the argument passed to the block.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.