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I'm trying to learn how to create a global closure in groovy (like the println closure). I have the following code:

a.groovy

def header = Tools.&header
header 'groovy script a'

b.groovy

def header = Tools.&header
header 'groovy script b'

tools.groovy

class Tools {
    def static header(String str) {
        println("\n${str}")
        println("-" * 80)
    }
}

I would like to avoid:

def header = Tools.&header

in every groovy script where I would like to use the Tools.header() (and just use header closure when I import the tools package). I tried to put the definition after the Tools class, but that did not work. Can this be done? Is there a better way to handle this?


EDIT: (using a metaClass and the evaluate method unless there is a simpler way to include an external script):

a.groovy

evaluate(new File("Tools.groovy"))
header 'groovy script a'

b.groovy

evaluate(new File("Tools.groovy"))
header 'groovy script b'

tools.groovy

Object.metaClass.header = {str ->
    println("\n${str}")
    println("-" * 80)
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

println is not actually a global closure. It's a method that is added to java.lang.Object using groovy metaprogramming. Because all classes extend Object - including the script class that wraps code run in the groovy console - println can be called from anywhere.

You can add your own methods to Object. Run this code in the Groovy console to see it in action:

// Add a global sayHello() method
Object.metaClass.sayHello = {-> println 'hello' }

// Try it out
sayHello()
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Thanks, that helps. I did need to add something like this to my scripts though: evaluate(new File("../tools/Tools.groovy")) to include the object.metaClass definition from one external script file into the other scripts. It's a kind of pseudo "include" (maybe not the correct terminology, but what it looked like to me conceptually) –  jmq Apr 6 '11 at 16:39

import static Tools.header should do the trick. You don't need a closure in this case as you call simple method. If you'll have to pass header as a closure somewhere in your code of a.groovy or b.groovy the &header still could be used.

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