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I wrote a program to determine the game tree for tic-tac-toe. I believe most of the code is in good order. I wrote a function that compares elements of a vector to determine if any elements are duplicates. Duplicate items can either be truly identical or they can be symmetrical. Duplicate elements are deleted from the vector. My compare function appears to have a problem where it incorrectly eliminates elements. Please take a look at how I iterate through the vector and see if the syntax/logic seems reasonable.

My guess is that using < > operators may be part of the problem. The basic logic of the function is to compare the first element with the last element, then the next to last element and so on. After comparing the first element with all elements you start again comparing the second element to the other elements and so on...

void compareAllGames(move& aMove) { /* aMove is a vector of games. games are a struct of data */
    vector<game>:: iterator frontIter = aMove.begin();
    vector<game>:: iterator rearIter = aMove.end() - 1;
    vector<game>:: iterator compIter;
    for (; frontIter < rearIter; frontIter++) { /* move along the games from first to last */
        for (compIter = aMove.end(); compIter > frontIter; ) { /* move along the games from last to first */
            /* checkForSymmetry compares *frontIter to all symmetries of *compIter */
            if (checkForSymmetry(*frontIter, *compIter)) {
                compIter--;
                aMove.erase(compIter + 1);
            }
            else {
                compIter--;
            }
        } /* reset iterators for next loop */
        compIter = aMove.end();
        rearIter = aMove.end();
    }
}
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Can you give a simple example of a case which produces the error? –  Beta Apr 6 '11 at 4:11
    
Can you explain the comparison logic? If you can create a total order, you could potentially sort the vector and remove duplicates in a single pass. That would be faster than the algorithm you currently have. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Apr 6 '11 at 4:12
    
Its worth mentioning std::vector::erase() returns an iterator to the next element that follows the one you just removed. That means you can write compIter = aMove.erase(compIter); and move --compIter into for() as the decrement step. –  greatwolf Apr 6 '11 at 5:01
    
Example of error - In tictactoe there are 3 possible 1st moves: center, corner, side. Before you check for symmetries there are 24 2nd moves. After the symmetry check their should be 12 but I come up with 11 and have verified that one is incorrectly moved. Later comments are confirming my suspicions about the iterators... –  fryeguy Apr 6 '11 at 5:43
    
I tried the compIter = aMove.erase(compIter); but this caused an infinite loop. Also the else condition below the .erase makes the --compIter inside the for loop not really work. –  fryeguy Apr 6 '11 at 19:41
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4 Answers 4

It looks like there are at least one or two places you access end which is past the end of your container. Instead of trying to fix the somewhat convoluted logic, I'd suggest one of:

If you can create an ordering that always arranges symmetric solutions adjacently you can apply that order and then use std::unique with a predicate to remove the duplicates.

If you can't do that, then use remove_if instead of your complicated inner loop:

void compareAllGames(move& aMove) { /* aMove is a vector of games. games are a struct of data */
    vector<game>:: iterator frontIter = aMove.begin();
    for (; frontIter < aMove.end() - 1; frontIter++) { /* move along the games from first to last */
        aMove.erase(std::remove_if(frontIter + 1, aMove.end(), std::bind1st(checkForSymmetry, *frontIter)), aMove.end());
    }
}
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Thanks for this comment. I read about remove_if in another context but wasn't certain if it made sense here. I haven't had a chance to dig into most of the algorithms in the STL. –  fryeguy Apr 6 '11 at 5:47
    
The remove_if function is probably a better option here. The way I check for symmetry is passing the first game and the comparison game to the checkSymmetry function which converts the comparison game into all the different symmetries and compares to the first game. I found an example of remove_if at http://www.cplusplus.com/. I can't determine if remove_if actually removes the odd items from the array in the example. Can someone confirm? What actually happens to the array? –  fryeguy Apr 8 '11 at 17:38
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This isn't really an answer per-say but just to help clarify to the OP what I meant in my comment.

/* aMove is a vector of games. games are a struct of data */
void compareAllGames( move &aMove ) 
{
    typedef vector<game>::iterator game_it;
    /* move along the games from first to last */
    for( game_it frontIter = aMove.begin(); frontIter != aMove.end(); ++frontIter ) 
    {
        /* move along the games from last to first */
        for( game_it compIter = aMove.end(); compIter != frontIter; --compIter )  
        {
            /* checkForSymmetry compares *frontIter to all symmetries of *compIter */
            if( checkForSymmetry( *frontIter, *compIter ) )
            {
                compIter = aMove.erase( compIter );
            }

        }
    }
}
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I like the use of typedef here. Otherwise creating iterators is a bit of a mouthful. –  fryeguy Apr 9 '11 at 23:56
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for (; frontIter < rearIter; frontIter++) { /* move along the games from first to last */

You're right: you should be using != instead of <. It probably doesn't make any difference, but absent a reason to do otherwise, you generally want to use pre-increment rather than post-increment as well, giving:

for (;frontIter != readiter; ++frontIter)
    for (compIter = aMove.end(); compIter > frontIter; ) { /* move along the games from last to first */

To traverse a collection in reverse, you usually want to use a reverse_iterator:

    vector<game>::reverse_iterator compIter;
    for (compIter=aMove.rbegin(); compIter != frontIter; ++compIter);

Offhand I don't remember whether you can directly compare an iterator to a reverse_iterator though -- you probably need to convert fronIter to a reverse_iterator to do the comparison.

        /* checkForSymmetry compares *frontIter to all symmetries of *compIter */
        if (checkForSymmetry(*frontIter, *compIter)) {
            compIter--;
            aMove.erase(compIter + 1);
        }
        else {
            compIter--;
        }
    } /* reset iterators for next loop */

While the conversion won't be entirely straightforward, it looks like this ends up as a variation of std::remove_if, so you may be able to change it to use a standard algorithm.

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I ended up simplifying my code to not have the confusing inner loop. Originally I did attempt to use a reverse_iterator but found that different types of iterators cannot be compared to eachother. –  fryeguy Apr 9 '11 at 16:06
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for all the comments. In the end I simplified my function that had the two confusing loops and determined that instead of adding all games to a move and then check for duplicates/symmetry, I could add a single game and compare it to the current list. This has two advantages: simpler coding that is easy to understand and a much lower number of comparisons. It doesn't hurt that this code actually works too. These changes led me to find a couple of bugs in my symmetry functions.

Here is the final function that I used:

bool compareAllGames(move& aMove) {
    vector<game>:: iterator frontIter = aMove.begin();
    vector<game>:: iterator rearIter = aMove.end() - 1;

    for (; frontIter != rearIter; ++frontIter) { // move along the games from first to last
        if (checkForSymmetry(*frontIter, aMove.back())) {
            aMove.pop_back();
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Now I just need to add my code back in that accounts for winners and I will have a proper adjusted count for the tic tac toe game tree. The unadjusted count (ignoring winners) by move is: 1, 2, 12, 38, 108, 174, 228, 174, 89, and 23.

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