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I need to design an API method which takes an OutputStream as a parameter.

Is it a good practice to close the stream inside the API method or let the caller close it?

test(OutputStream os) {

os.close() //???
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think it should be symmetric.

If you do not open that stream (which is likely to be your case), you should not close it, either, in general.

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+1 for 'symmetric' –  Heiko Rupp Apr 6 '11 at 5:31

Unless the purpose of the API is to "finish up the stream", you should let the caller close. He had it first, he was responsible for it, and he may decide that he wants to write some stuff to the stream that your API didn't originally envision. Keep your functionality seperated; its more composable.

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Let user close it. As you are taking OutputStream in argument so we can think that user has already created and opened it. So if you close in your method it will be not good. And if you are just taking new OutputStream as argument and opens it in your method then no need to take it as argument and you can also close it in your method.

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Different use-cases require different patterns, for example, depending on whether the caller needs to read from or write to the stream after the call has completed.

The key API design rule is that the API should specify whether it is the caller or called method's responsibility to close the stream.

Having said that, it is generally simpler and safer if the code that opens a stream is also responsible for closing it.

Consider the case where methodA is supposed to open a stream and pass it to methodB, but an exception is thrown between the stream being opened and methodB entering the try / finally statement that is ultimately responsible for closing it. You need to code it something like the following to ensure that streams don't leak:

    public void methodA() throws IOException {
        InputStream myStream = new FileInputStream(...);
        try {
            // do stuff with stream
            methodB(myStream);
        } finally {
            myStream.close();
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param myStream this method is responsible for closing myStream.
     */
    public void methodB(InputStream myStream) throws IOException {
        try {
            // do more stuff with myStream
        } finally {
            myStream.close();
        }
    }

This won't leak an open stream as a result of exceptions (or errors!) thrown in either methodA or methodB. (It works for the standard stream types because the Closable API specifies that close has no effect when called on a stream that is already closed.)

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