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which of the following code is more appropriate situation where multiple threads access the function

public ArrayList CallMe1()
    {
        ArrayList al = new ArrayList();

        lock(al.SyncRoot)
        {
            al.Add("33");
            al.Add("45");

            return al;
        }

    }

    public ArrayList CallMe2()
    {

        ArrayList al = new ArrayList();

        Monitor.Enter(al);

        al.Add("33");
        al.Add("45");
        Monitor.Exit(al);

        return al;


    }
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7 Answers 7

There's no shared state in this case, so synchronisation is unnecessary.

However, assuming the arraylist was shared state, the following applies:

They're both the same (lock implements Monitor internally).

Mostly.

Your second version needs to release the monitor in a finally block, otherwise if the code throws an exception, the lock will never be released and will lead to deadlocks in your application.

In summary, use the first version (lock (...) {... }) to avoid unnecessary typing and possible mistakes.

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ok ... actually the arraylist should be shared ... this was question in 70-536 exam which i just answered and cleared with a decent score of 950.. i had doubt regarding this one ... –  deep Feb 17 '09 at 10:37
    
considering the arralylist is shared ... which is a better code? i was puzzled with return with the lock{ return al;} i chose Monitor.enter and exit ... i remember checking on msdn the first one lock is used .. –  deep Feb 17 '09 at 10:39
    
Because lock implements a finally block, the return statement will still execute the contents of the finally block, therefore it will release the monitor. –  Neil Barnwell Feb 17 '09 at 19:19

Neither. Functions don't share any data, so no syncronisation is needed.

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Neither. None of your functions have shared state (only local variables), which makes them inherently reentrant. No synchronization is required whatsoever.

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As other answers have stated lock uses monitor but it does it in a better way than your second example. It's better in that it wraps calls to monitor in a try finally block ensuring that the lock is released if there is an exception.

For this reason I recommend that you use lock for nearly all operations.

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what happens if there is a exception inside lock? –  deep Feb 17 '09 at 10:51
    
Given no exception are going to occur (as this was exam question), i chose monitor.enter and exit ... was i right? –  deep Feb 17 '09 at 10:52
    
I assumed that the code you posted was just a simple example and that you wouldn't really just be adding "33" and "45". Therefor I assumed that there would be at least the possibility of a ArgumentNullException. –  ng5000 Feb 17 '09 at 11:20

1 - You don't need any lock here.

2 - Don't use Monitor if you can do it with a lock.

3 - In the first exemple, you are locking a SyncRoot object, it's better than locking on an array.

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You can also find a part of the answer here.

Return statement inside (CallMe1) or outside (CallMe2) the lock makes also no difference.

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the problem with .net lock is that in case of a deadlock it is not going to throw any exception or anything.

By the way you are taking lock on a newly created ArrayList every time. How is that supposed to help? I prefer creating a static object somewhere and taking a lock on that.

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would be thankful if the down vote is explained. –  Sesh Feb 17 '09 at 10:29
    
static lock object somewhere? doesn't sound like a good idea to me... –  Svish Feb 17 '09 at 11:06
    
Except if it's a static method. .) –  Rytmis Feb 17 '09 at 11:14
    
That's not really a problem with lock. It's a problem with your code. Monitor doesn't handle deadlock as well. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 17 '09 at 11:21
    
@Svish - its not a static lock but lock on a static object. –  Sesh Feb 17 '09 at 12:03

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