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I want to close the SqlConnection in the Finally since the using not really close it and the connection pool gets full. but I don't realize what's the right way to fo that since the conn object isn't reachable any more in the finally section.

try 
{
    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr)) 
    {
        //...
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    //...
}
finally 
{
    conn.Close //?!?!?!?!???
}
share|improve this question
3  
You have some other problem. using is internally implemented as a try/finally pair, with Dispose being called in the finally block. And for SqlConnection, Close and Dispose are interchangable. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 6 '11 at 9:08
    
As mentioned as an answer, I would suggest you to check the same thing about DataReaders : the way you are closing Connection is ok. – Larry Apr 6 '11 at 9:13
    
Oh, I completely missed the point that the complete Using block is inside a try{ } block. I misread this because bracket are indented a strange way. – Larry Apr 6 '11 at 11:53
up vote 10 down vote accepted
using (var conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr)) 
{
    //code
}

is expaded to:

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr);
try
{
    //code
}
finally
{
    conn.Dispose();
}

So you should handle errors but you can forget about closing connection.

share|improve this answer
    
(A small nitpick: Your expansion is incorrect. If the constructor throws then the attempt to call Dispose in the finally block will also throw a NullReferenceException and hide the real error. The compiler actually puts the assignment outside the try block, and then performs a null check in the finally block too, before calling Dispose.) – LukeH Apr 6 '11 at 9:28

You don't need to close conn in the finally block. The using block will handle closing the connection for you. (In fact, you probably don't need the try...finally at all in this case, unless you have other resources that need dealing with in the finally.)

The using block will translate to something like this:

var conn = new SqlConnection(/*...*/);
try
{
    // ...
}
finally
{
    if (conn != null)
        ((IDisposable)conn).Dispose();
}

The Dispose method of the SqlConnection object will be called in the finally block, and the Dispose method goes on to call Close for you.

share|improve this answer
1  
Always initialize inside the try block. – Claus Jørgensen Apr 6 '11 at 9:14
5  
@Claus: I'm only explaining what's generated by the compiler, and that performs the assignment immediately before the try block, exactly as I've shown. You should check your facts before downvoting! – LukeH Apr 6 '11 at 9:35

Exiting a using block calls .Dispose() on the object, for a SqlConnection will close the connection and any open resources.

So the try, finally block is not needed.

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As per my understanding Dispose() method of connection object will close the Connection. You don't need to call Connection.Close explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
Dispose calls .Close() internally. The difference is you can't reopen it when it's disposed. – Claus Jørgensen Apr 6 '11 at 9:15
1  
thats true. I didn't thought about that. But if we are using "using" keyword, then no point in calling Connection.Close() right? – Anuraj Apr 6 '11 at 9:17
    
Yep, that's correct – Claus Jørgensen Apr 6 '11 at 9:20

The way you are closing the connection with Using is Ok. Perhaps you might have forgotten to close some DataReaders instead ?

share|improve this answer

AFAIK, the following using statement:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr)) 
{

}

Is equivalent to:

SqlConnection conn;
try
{
    //`using` scope operations are executed here
    conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr));

}
catch
{
    //exceptions are bubbled
    throw;
}
finally
{
    //Dispose is always called
    conn.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. It's equiviliant to doing: var conn = new SqlConnection(_dbconnstr); { ... } conn.Dispose(); It have nothing to do with try/catch. {} represents a scope in C#. – Claus Jørgensen Apr 6 '11 at 9:16
    
@Claus Jørgensen: So that would mean pretty much every answer to this question is wrong by you reasoning? Wrong. It does have everything to do with (at least) try / finally. – Grant Thomas Apr 6 '11 at 9:18
1  
No, just about half of them. (Also note the comment was updated) – Claus Jørgensen Apr 6 '11 at 9:19
    
@Claus Jørgensen: Your first comment doesn't make sense - just newing up an instance and expecting to be able to reach the Dispose call is not how using works: using guarantees Dispose will be called, and this happens within a finally block. – Grant Thomas Apr 6 '11 at 9:22

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