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Why there is no pop_front method in C++ std::vector?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because a std::vector has no particular feature regarding inserting elements at the front, unlike some other containers. The functionality provided by each container makes sense for that container.

You probably should be using a std::deque, which is explicitly good at inserting at the front and back.

Check this diagram out.

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Because push_back and pop_back are special operations for a vector that require only O(1) computation. Any other push or pop takes O(n).

This is not a "bug" or a "quirk", this is just a property of the vector container. If you need a fast pop_front consider changing to an other container.

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Specifically, consider changing to std::deque<> if you need fast pop_front(). –  ildjarn Apr 6 '11 at 9:15
    
"requires only O(1) computation" - amortized O(1) in the case of push_back, worst case is Theta(n) when it has to reallocate because you haven't reserved the space. –  Steve Jessop Apr 6 '11 at 9:15
    
I left out allocation in this example because the user was talking about popping. You are right though. –  nightcracker Apr 6 '11 at 9:17
    
Naturally it would have to do a re-allocation, but why would that be O(n) in comparison to a re-allocation of 'push_back' –  Daniel Apr 6 '11 at 9:26
    
@Daniel: Because push_back doesn't always have to re-allocate. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 24 '12 at 23:08
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vector is typically implemented something like this:

struct 
{
  T* begin; // points to the first T in the vector
  T* end; // points just after the last T in the vector
  int capacity; // how many Ts of memory were allocated
};

"begin" serves double-duty as "pointer to the first T in the vector" and "pointer to all the memory we allocated." therefore it's impossible to "pop" elements off the front of the vector by simply incrementing "begin" - do this and you no longer have a pointer to the memory you need to deallocate. that would leak memory. so a "pop_front" would need to copy all the Ts from the back of the vector to the front of the vector, and that is comparatively slow. so they decided to leave it out of the standard.

what you want is something like this:

struct 
{
  T* allocated; // points to all the memory we allocated
  T* begin; // points to the first T in the vector
  T* end; // points just after the last T in the vector
  int capacity; // how many Ts of memory were allocated
};

with this, you can "pop_front" by moving "begin" forward and backward with no danger of forgetting which memory to deallocate later. why doesn't std::vector work this way? i guess it was a matter of taste among those who wrote the standard. their goal was probably to provide the simplest possible "dynamically resizeable array" they could, and i think they succeeded.

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Probably because it would be monumentally slow for large vectors.

pop_front() on a vector containing 1000 objects would require 999 operator=() calls.

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Not any slower then erase(v.begin()). It's because vectors have no special properties for pushing in the beginning, opposed to pushing at the end (or popping). –  nightcracker Apr 6 '11 at 9:13
    
@nightcracker - True, erase() is equally bad. And I agree that wanting pop_front() on a vector is a good 'smell' that you're using the wrong type of container! –  Roddy Apr 6 '11 at 9:17
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However, if you need a pop_front and do NOT care about the index of the elements in the vector, you can do kind of a pop_front with something like

template<typename T>
void pop_front(std::vector<T>& vec)
{
   vec.front() = vec.back();
   vec.pop_back();
}
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It would be a weird case where you both did and did not care about the order of elements. Because if you really didn't care, this is even easier: template<typename T> void pop_front(std::vector<T>& v) { v.pop_back(); } –  MSalters Apr 6 '11 at 12:16
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